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Weight Loss Tips from Around the World

 
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wosnes



Joined: 18 Sep 2006
Posts: 4166
Location: Indianapolis, IN, USA

PostPosted: Mon Jul 14, 2008 3:04 pm    Post subject: Weight Loss Tips from Around the World Reply with quote

I saw this on the Today show this morning.

Quote:
Weight Loss Tips From Around the World

Nearly two thirds of Americans are overweight or obese. Our rate of weight gain is escalating faster than anywhere else on earth, particularly in children. What's happening to us? The obesity epidemic in our country has only been a problem in the 50 years or so, when food has become both cheap and abundant - so the "genetics" of obesity can't explain much about this (genetic changes don't happen in a couple of generations!)

What are we doing wrong in America? We have more “diet” foods in the US than anywhere else in the world, and we’re among the top heaviest nations.

We can learn a lot from the eating habits of people in other countries. That's the topic of my Today Show segment (check back later for the video).

There are a lot of world-wide diet tips, but I've picked 4 countries to represent these trends:

Japan, France, Italy, and Greece. For comparison, the Japanese have an incidence of obesity of about 3% - that's 10 times less than in the USA, where we weight in around 30% of obesity among our adult population. Let's take a look at why this might be so. And, please post your ideas on this topic!!

Take a look at this info and see how different this can be from typical American eating. Healthy weight fundamentals in other countries include:

Portions are small and controlled
Reliance on fresh, unprocessed foods
Enjoying food as a social occasion, with friends and family
No foods are off limits – no “good” or “bad” foods
No meal skipping
Very limited snacking
Activity of daily living – a lot of walking!! (20 minute stroll = 1 mile = 100 calories
Interested in some specific tips from particular countries? Read on!

JAPAN
Broth-based soups -fill you up before a meal
Soy as major protein source - low in fat and calories (tofu, edamame)
Very limited use of red meat, used more as a garnish than “main dish”.
Rice/veggie combinations replace protein – not add to it
Variety of veggies for a colorful plate
Sushi – lean protein (fish) or veggies with small amount of rice – good nutrient balance

FRANCE
Food quality, not quantity is important
"Iindulgence” means small quantity of a special food, not more food
Fresh, flavorful foods in small portions
No meal skipping – regular meal intervals
No snacking
All foods in moderation – even dessert
No eating on the run – relaxed eating as social event (ie, no cup holders!)


ITALY
Meals are social and a celebration of family and friends
Longer, leisurely meals are the norm – more social, less food
Limited portions, even for pasta! (5 oz is normal in Italy - double that in the US!)
Red wine and olive oil reign - and natives consume the fruit as well (grapes and olives).
Abundant fresh tomatoes, garlics, herbs and spices provide fabulous flavor and satisfaction.
Wine is part of meal, or serves as dessert.
Flavorful aged cheeses – like parmiagiano – provide lots of flavor with a smaller serving size.

GREECE
Mediterranean focus on abundant fresh produce: tomatoes, onions, eggplant, spinach, artichokes are favorites
Olive oil is chief source of fat
Meat as “extender” – not a big hunk – rather, stuffed grape leaves – with chopped lamb or beef and rice.
Use of tangy, intensely flavored feta cheese – lots of flavor with a small amount (and fewer calories)
Chick peas and nuts are protein sources
Use of plain strained yogurt (concentrated flavor – most water removed); eaten plain or as a base for sauces


I don't think the Greeks eat their yogurt so much plain as with honey or sweetened fruits. It's good!

I found this about 13 years ago in Prevention magazine:

Habits from around the world:

1. Increased physical activity
2. They didn't snack all the time
3. They didn't eat as many fatty foods (meat isn't as big a part of their diet)
4. Their portions were smaller
5. Grains/starches starred in their meals
6. They didn't routinely eat desserts/sweets (but they didn't eliminate or avoid them, either)
_________________
"That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do. Not that the nature of the thing itself has changed but our power to do it is increased." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

"You are what you eat -- so don't be Fast, Easy, Cheap or Fake."
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cvmom



Joined: 13 May 2005
Posts: 639
Location: California

PostPosted: Mon Jul 14, 2008 5:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks, Woes...this is worth looking at.

I will also add that the Japanese eat very little dairy and very little bread and virtually no refined sugar.

I think that the more refined, sugary laden stuff we consume here has to contribute. Not to mention all the fake foods that we have in the middle aisles at our supermarkets. (Pop Tarts, Hot Pockets, Frozen Breaded fish, etc.)

I could go on and on, but I do think that sugar is White Death. Which is why I do no S. I love the sweet stuff and with No S its the only way I can control it! Surprised

I'll bet if you are not happy with your NoS results at the moment and just make the commitment this week to eat at home with no take out, deli, or restaurant foods for two or three days you will see a difference. As annoying as it is, we all need to get back into our kitchens and prepare our own food. I like convenience as much as the next person, but I also know that convenience has a price.

Just more "food for thought"
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wosnes



Joined: 18 Sep 2006
Posts: 4166
Location: Indianapolis, IN, USA

PostPosted: Mon Jul 14, 2008 6:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

cvmom wrote:


I will also add that the Japanese eat very little dairy and very little bread and virtually no refined sugar.



It was noted that the Japanese eat lots of white rice, the French eat bread and pastries, and the Italians pasta and bread. The difference is that all of them are more moderate in their portions. I found it interesting that no food or food group is considered "bad." Of course, until recently, they didn't have much in the way of junk foods available to them and they didn't eat around the clock, though nearly all of them snack -- and often snack on sweets.
_________________
"That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do. Not that the nature of the thing itself has changed but our power to do it is increased." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

"You are what you eat -- so don't be Fast, Easy, Cheap or Fake."
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blueskighs



Joined: 27 Mar 2008
Posts: 1787
Location: California

PostPosted: Mon Jul 14, 2008 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

unfortunately would like to note that at least now in Italy there are a lot of overweight people and junky food,

we were quite surprised and disappointed when we went two years ago. We had to search and make real effort to get more traditional fare.

when we went to France about six years ago there were lots and mostly very slim people but not so in Italy any more,

we are slowly? exporting our bad eating habits ....

Blueskighs
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www.nosdiet.blogspot.com Where I blog daily about my No S journey
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windrose



Joined: 05 Jun 2008
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Mon Jul 14, 2008 6:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To me the article sounds like exactly what Reinhard has been saying. In fact some of the wording is so close - I wonder if she (Dr. Madelyn Fernstrom) has read his book or visited this website.

Windrose
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thepast123



Joined: 09 Feb 2017
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Thu Feb 09, 2017 5:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

windrose wrote:
To me the article sounds like exactly what Reinhard has been saying. In fact some of the wording is so close - I wonder if she (Dr. Madelyn Fernstrom) has read his book or visited this website.

http://bodycompblueprint.com/

Windrose


Hello windrose,
I have also visited website, but I don't know about any book. So could you please tell me which book you are talking about?


Last edited by thepast123 on Sun Feb 12, 2017 9:24 am; edited 2 times in total
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oolala53



Joined: 06 Oct 2008
Posts: 7318
Location: San Diego, CA USA

PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2017 7:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

The post was from about 8 years ago, so don't know if you'll get a direct response. I looked up the doctor's name and saw three books, two of which were more specialized. Maybe it was this book?
http://www.therealyoudiet.com/

Just found it as a pdf online.

http://nrc.ajums.ac.ir/_nrc/documents/The%20Real%20You%20Diet.pdf

When I searched, know what the next link that came up was? The No S Diet!
_________________
Count plates, not calories. Three a day. 7 years & counting
Age 63 SBMI Jan/10-30.8 Jan/12-26.8 Mar/13-24.9 Dec/15 24.8 held steady +/- 8-lb. for two years Mar/17 22.8

There is no S better than Vanilla No S.
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eam531



Joined: 08 Jun 2014
Posts: 22
Location: Buffalo, NY

PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2017 5:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I lived in Germany (Munich) in 1984 and have been back to visit numerous times. While Germany has a reputation as a meat and potatoes kind of place, I saw few if any obese Germans while there, certainly none in 1984 and not too many after that. (Probably the obese people I saw were American tourists.)

That might be because of a higher activity level in daily life (more walking and riding bicycles for commuting and errands), more stair climbing in subway stations and apartment buildings, and portion control. Sure, people would meet for afternoon kaffee und kuchen, but I didn't get the feeling it was a 7 day a week thing.

The woman I lived with in 1984 (we are still quite close) controlled her portions, didn't snack, and limited (but didn't completely eliminate) treats. She is still slim at age 78 or so, walks most places and has been a role model for me in aging well.
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oolala53



Joined: 06 Oct 2008
Posts: 7318
Location: San Diego, CA USA

PostPosted: Wed Feb 15, 2017 9:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I was surprised when I did some comparative research on the average BMI for different countries that Germany's was pretty low. I was guilty of having that stereotype of a hefty German chowing down on loads of sausages, potatoes and beer. Obviously, they do it in moderation.

Also, I took the liberty of adding this to the "Resources that support NO S/ habits, etc."
_________________
Count plates, not calories. Three a day. 7 years & counting
Age 63 SBMI Jan/10-30.8 Jan/12-26.8 Mar/13-24.9 Dec/15 24.8 held steady +/- 8-lb. for two years Mar/17 22.8

There is no S better than Vanilla No S.
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