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Shovelglove research, and a New exercise

 
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RobbyRob



Joined: 31 Oct 2005
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2005 1:17 am    Post subject: Shovelglove research, and a New exercise Reply with quote

This is my second week of shugging, and it's great.

I went out last week and got me a 10 pounder, then wrapped it in an old pair of jeans that I've long "outgrown" (exta motivation, you see!) After a failed initial attempt at 14 minutes (my but it HAS been a while), I backed off to 10 minutes a session for the first week, and 12 minutes a day for the second. Next week I'll step it up to 14. A few notes:


- I thought you might like some more research on useful movements. Outside Magazine's big, award-winning "Shape of Your Life" program includes an article on what they call "functional exercise." It says, in part...

"INSIDE THE TYPICAL Foghat-themed weight room you'll find two typical users: bronzed apes getting ripped by hogging the bench, leg sled, and mirrors; and past-their-prime athletes hoping to cut an old squash injury off at the pass with a lazy machine circuit. Too bad. Not only are such routines mind- and soul-numbing, but because they're derived from bodybuildingóa dubious athletic niche that treats muscles as trophies rather than team membersóboth are fundamentally flawed. For the kind of usable musculature that may not seal the deal on ElimiDate but will sharpen your prowess on the trail, slopes, or river, it's time to embrace functional training, an approach to lifting that mimics movements actually involved in sports."

The link is here: http://outside.away.com/outside/bodywork/200206/200206_shape_of_your_life_month2.html


- Also, (in my quest for the longest post ever) here's a new exercise I came up with the other day:

Ever see "Last of the Mohicans?" Man, those guys were ripped. That's where I got the inspiration for Paddle the Canoe (unfortunately, it's less kinky than it sounds).

Hold the shovelglove vertical in front of you with the business end pointed down. The left arm should be fully extended, with the left hand over the end of the handle, while the right supports the weight by holding the shaft.

Pull the right hand back along your body in a paddling motion, following through until your right elbow is pointed behind you in a 90 degree angle (forearm vertical, upper arm horizontal). The handle of the shovelglove should now be horizontal. Reverse the process to return to the start position.

This is a good one for the lats, shoulders, and triceps, and also a little biceps and chest.

- Finally, does anyone have any ideas on motions that give the legs a good workout?
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RobbyRob



Joined: 31 Oct 2005
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2005 1:49 am    Post subject: PS Reply with quote

One other quote from that same Outside Magazine article, that might be useful advice when it comes to saving your back:

"As long as you concentrate on the following, you can't go wrong," says Chuck Wolf, manager for human performance at the USA Triathlon National Training Center. "To protect your lumbar spine, when you twist, make sure your pelvis leads the way. Second, when you bend forward, pull your abs in. This will reduce the risk of spine injury and keep your back straight."
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gratefuldeb67



Joined: 21 Apr 2005
Posts: 6169
Location: NY

PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2005 2:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Robby Smile
Glad you are having a fun time with SG!
Good advice to "lead with the pelvis"... I recommend you do a few squats and maybe just use the SG as a counterbalance...
I used to lift it up using the top of my foot, while holding the handle just to keep it from rolling off to the side... But that just worked the Psoas and part of the quads...
It's really designed to be used by the upper extremities...
You could always just take two minute "kick boxing" breaks inbetween SG moves!
Peace and Love,
Cool Deb
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Jammin' Jan



Joined: 05 May 2005
Posts: 2002
Location: The Village

PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2005 1:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To work the lower body:

1] when I do Stoke the Engine, I get down into a full wide-stance lunge position, then, without moving the feet, I lunge forward a bit with the legs while moving the shovelglove forward. Good for quads and hamstrings.

2] when doing that hoist the bales/smash the ceiling lights thing (kind of the reverse of churning butter), my legs do a plie movement: wider than shoulder stance, toes pointed out 45 degrees, as the shovelglove goes up, I rise up on my toes a bit (don't over-extend this). Good for calf muscles.

3) I do churning butter with squats. Quads, hamstrings, calf muscles.

4) an exercise I posted a while back, washing clothes on the washboard has recently become (in my mind) Pump the Handcar, and is actually a bent-over row. Imagine pumping one of those old railroad handcars. Do this holding the hammer part of your shovelglove. Bent-over and deep enough squats. Suck in the abs while you do this to protect your lower back. Quads, hamstrings, lower back, abs are all strengthened.

How's that for lower body?
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reinhard
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Joined: 12 Apr 2005
Posts: 5756
Location: Cambridge, MA

PostPosted: Fri Nov 04, 2005 1:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Welcome, Robbyrob, and thanks for the link.

I'm very happy to see "functional exercise" catching on vs. cosmetic exercise. But here's one issue I have with the movements described in this article and that I've read about in other places: it's still all about muscle, not about mind. The movements may train real muscles, but they don't do so in a real way. And that real way, something that feels like a useful movement, it what makes the exercise fun, and that, to me, is more important than mere physiological effectiveness -- because otherwise I wouldn't keep doing them, and then who cares how effective they are. The article shows these pictures of this surfer dude lugging a log around, but that's just for show: the actual recommended movements are contrived and gym-like.

I came up with the term "useful movements" before I'd ever heard of "functional exercise," and I guess this is the distinction:

"Functional exercise" exercises muscles for a real world function. The actual movement may look and feel nothing like the real world movement.

"Useful movements" exercises muscles by mimicking a real world function. Every movement looks and feels like a real world movement. This may be less efficient, physiologically, but it's more fun.

I guess you could consider "useful movements" a subset of "functional exercise."

For the legs, a bunch of people (including myself, sporadically) have been doing "hindu squats" as part of their routines (also known as "pick up the pieces" or "fertilize the fields"). Some do it holding the sledge as a stabilizer, but most prefer to do this one without (it's presumably safer, and none of the metaphors suggest it).

But I leave leg-work mostly to urban ranger. As functional as you can get.

Looking forward to hearing more from you,

Reinhard
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RobbyRob



Joined: 31 Oct 2005
Posts: 6

PostPosted: Mon Nov 07, 2005 4:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

As far as efficiency, I would say, after having done both the Outside workout for some time (over a year, in all) and the SG for just two weeks, that SG is just as efficient, if not moreso. It recruits a wide range of muscles throughout the body, and makes them work together. Much more holistic. I was only bringing in the other because I think that some of the quotes from the so-called experts may be useful in supporting the way of the glove.

Good point about the psychological benefits of useful movements, too.

I was mulling over it this weekend, and I think that there is a psychology of the body at work here. That is, the body is more stimulated by and more "interested" by useful movements than it is by movements done in isolation. Proof is in the post-workout "charge" that I always feel, which I never get from gym workouts. I used to be a rower, and even though we didn't win that many races, there was something about the movement of rowing itself that would always leave me happier and in a better frame of mind than I started. Maybe it's the complexity of the movement or the rhythm or something, but the feeling with SG is very similar. I'll have to think more about this...
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storm fox



Joined: 10 Aug 2005
Posts: 119

PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2005 10:52 pm    Post subject: Some additional thoughts on leg work... Reply with quote

http://home.comcast.net/~joandbryce/bsquat.html
This, especially the lopsided one, could be done with a shovelglove.

http://danjohn.org/overhead.html
This can be done with one or two hands.

http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/legpower.htm
Don't be fooled by the bodybuilding garbage, this exercise is awesome!
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KrazyKat



Joined: 23 Jan 2006
Posts: 45
Location: Midwest

PostPosted: Sat Jan 28, 2006 2:22 am    Post subject: psychology of work Reply with quote

It is interesting to me what you all are saying about "useful movement" and satisfaction;
For instance, I have been very physically active all my life, not as an athlete but as someone doing very physical work.

I enjoy it. It produces something. I love doing landscape work and never have to really "talk myself into doing it" like I do exercise at a gym...or even walking, although I enjoy walking far more than the gym treadmill. Also for psychological reasons, and not because it is functional (ie Shopping, walking to the mailbox, the store, etc). I like walking in the woods or the hood, as it is a time to meditate and regroup.

So it all seems pretty self-evident that we derive satisfaction from useful movements because they are integrated into our daily needs.[/quote]
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Big Phil



Joined: 12 Jul 2005
Posts: 91
Location: Adelaide, South Australia

PostPosted: Tue Jan 31, 2006 7:09 am    Post subject: Leg exercises Reply with quote

Welcome,
On the leg exercises front I did hindu squats for a while but found them a bit too static and mono-dimensional. Once you get up to the 40 and 50 reps they can take up a fair amount of your 14 minutes as well. I swapped to exercises from Vern Gambetta "Functional leg strength for Sports Performance" video. Namely, body weight squats - feet wide apart, go deep into the squat so the thighs are parallel and pump out about 20 in 20 seconds - get that eccentric strength working. I also do single-leg squats, like the "pistol" from Storm-fox, but not as hard. Stand on one leg and bend the knee of other to 90 degrees in front of you. The bent leg is then your guide for knowing how far to squat and in what proportion of hip, ankle and knee (keep the toes up on the bent leg). Bend your support leg now until the toes of the other foot just touch the ground, then push back. Keep both hands on your belly-button so the balance comes from your core and not from waving your arms around. This builds a lot of strength and balance as the legs are doing as much work as if you were squatting normally with a barbell equal to your bodyweight. I do ten a day in my SG routine. They are also very functional as most bipedal movement is off of one foot onto another, you rarely use both legs at the same time.
I also do lunges, 10 a day with hands behind head. If you imagine you are facing north I lunge to the north, north-west (left leg), north-east (right leg), west (left) and east (right). 10 reps per leg. Lunges rule as they build range of motion and eccentric strength. But only do a few first up as they will make you sore. I have found the best way to lose the soreness is to do them again the next day and kind of work out the soreness, but if you do them, take it slow building up or you will hate me. Finally I do single leg calf-raises - 10 per day on each leg.
These all work pretty well for me and are easy to do anywhere while still being quite challenging.

See Ya,

Phil.
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DillonBrummet



Joined: 11 Oct 2010
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Mon Oct 11, 2010 6:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Big Pehil wrote:
Welcome,
On the leg exercises front I did hindu squats for a while but found them a bit too static and mono-dimensional. Once you get up to the 40 and 50 reps they can take up a fair amount of your 14 minutes as well. I swapped to exercises from Vern Gambetta "Functional leg strength for Sports Performance" video. Namely, body weight squats - feet wide apart, go deep into the squat so the thighs are parallel and pump out about 20 in 20 seconds - get that eccentric strength working. I also do single-leg squats, like the "pistol" from Storm-fox, but not as hard. Stand on one leg and bend the knee of other to 90 degrees in front of you. Then the Crazy Bulk site https://deadliftdonkey.com/my-crazy-bulk-review has it. The bent leg is then your guide for knowing how far to squat and in what proportion of hip, ankle and knee (keep the toes up on the bent leg). Bend your support leg now until the toes of the other foot just touch the ground, then push back. Keep both hands on your belly-button so the balance comes from your core and not from waving your arms around. This builds a lot of strength and balance as the legs are doing as much work as if you were squatting normally with a barbell equal to your bodyweight. I do ten a day in my SG routine. They are also very functional as most bipedal movement is off of one foot onto another, you rarely use both legs at the same time.
I also do lunges, 10 a day with hands behind head. If you imagine you are facing north I lunge to the north, north-west (left leg), north-east (right leg), west (left) and east (right). 10 reps per leg. Lunges rule as they build range of motion and eccentric strength. But only do a few first up as they will make you sore. I have found the best way to lose the soreness is to do them again the next day and kind of work out the soreness, but if you do them, take it slow building up or you will hate me. Finally I do single leg calf-raises - 10 per day on each leg.
These all work pretty well for me and are easy to do anywhere while still being quite challenging.

See Ya,

Phil.


I agree, I don't see the point of Hindu squats.


Last edited by DillonBrummet on Mon Sep 19, 2016 11:24 am; edited 7 times in total
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reinhard
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Joined: 12 Apr 2005
Posts: 5756
Location: Cambridge, MA

PostPosted: Tue Oct 12, 2010 3:54 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
I agree, I don't see the point of Hindu squats.


Well, I've discovered that if you do enough of them, you won't be able to walk for a week. That's something. Smile
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chiangmaiboss



Joined: 18 Jun 2009
Posts: 88

PostPosted: Wed Oct 13, 2010 4:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is very interesting posting. I like the paddle movemets you say. However I must add something. I am 1/4 Mohawk and have paddled canoes years both here and in America. In fact I am from the area which is setting for story Last of the Mohicans. I love the movie and watch it many times. However the Indians in the movie do not look like any that I grew up with or even have met. I usupect these Mohicans have sopent some time in the gym. All the paddling I have done never made me ripped up like these movie Indians. However I still believe rowing is great and I like to paddle kayak on Ping River in Chiang Mai.
I do many Hindu squats and after I hurt back I still did them and found they helped my injury and were not painful to do. In jujitsu we do them and many japanese judo and jujitsu players as well as American and of course Indian wrestlers swear by them. I do exercise I described before where I do hindu squats with the hammer and after I come up from floor I do 1 butterchurn type movement. It realy makes heart beat quickly.
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Benjamin



Joined: 01 Oct 2016
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PostPosted: Sat Oct 01, 2016 5:50 pm    Post subject: Robbyrob Wrote Reply with quote

As far as efficiency, I would say, after having done both the Outside workout for some time (over a year, in all) and the SG for just two weeks, that SG is just as efficient, if not moreso. It recruits a wide range of muscles throughout the body, and makes them work together. Much more holistic. I was only bringing in the other because I think that some of the quotes from the so-called experts may be useful in supporting the way of the glove.

Good point about the psychological benefits of useful movements, too.
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friscobob



Joined: 24 Jan 2006
Posts: 78

PostPosted: Mon Nov 21, 2016 9:21 pm    Post subject: Bodyweight Exercise Is Great Reply with quote

If you do bodyweight exercise for 10 minutes, you will get a great workout. Just do as many reps as you feel comfortable doing. Pushups, crunches, squats, leg raises, and mountain climbers. Do each exercise one after the other, with no rest in between. In less than 10 minutes you will be huffing and puffing and producing pools of sweat! Keep moving!
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Katherine24



Joined: 24 Dec 2016
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PostPosted: Sat Dec 24, 2016 11:21 am    Post subject: Re: Bodyweight Exercise Is Great Reply with quote

friscobob wrote:
If you do bodyweight exercise for 10 minutes, you will get a great workout. Just do as many reps as you feel comfortable doing. Pushups, crunches, squats, very hard to find any steroids alternatives at GNC will help you select the best weight loss supplement to go along your diet and exerciser leg raises, and mountain climbers. Do each exercise one after the other, with no rest in between. In less than 10 minutes you will be huffing and puffing and producing pools of sweat! Keep moving!


yeah, thats what my trainer told me, Super sets keep pushing your limits and they will keep on expanding so will your strength and stamina.
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Awesomus_Maximus



Joined: 06 Jul 2017
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Thu Jul 06, 2017 9:24 am    Post subject: Re: Leg exercises Reply with quote

Big Phil wrote:
Welcome,
On the leg exercises front I did hindu squats for a while but found them a bit too static and mono-dimensional. Once you get up to the 40 and 50 reps they can take up a fair amount of your 14 minutes as well. I swapped to exercises from Vern Gambetta "Functional leg strength for Sports Performance" video. Namely, body weight squats - feet wide apart, go deep into the squat so the thighs are parallel and pump out about 20 in 20 seconds - get that eccentric strength working. http://phenq-avis.com/en/ has some really good tips to lose weight I also do single-leg squats, like the "pistol" from Storm-fox, but not as hard. Stand on one leg and bend the knee of other to 90 degrees in front of you. The bent leg is then your guide for knowing how far to squat and in what proportion of hip, ankle and knee (keep the toes up on the bent leg). Bend your support leg now until the toes of the other foot just touch the ground, then push back. Keep both hands on your belly-button so the balance comes from your core and not from waving your arms around. This builds a lot of strength and balance as the legs are doing as much work as if you were squatting normally with a barbell equal to your bodyweight. I do ten a day in my SG routine. They are also very functional as most bipedal movement is off of one foot onto another, you rarely use both legs at the same time.
I also do lunges, 10 a day with hands behind head. If you imagine you are facing north I lunge to the north, north-west (left leg), north-east (right leg), west (left) and east (right). 10 reps per leg. Lunges rule as they build range of motion and eccentric strength. But only do a few first up as they will make you sore. I have found the best way to lose the soreness is to do them again the next day and kind of work out the soreness, but if you do them, take it slow building up or you will hate me. Finally I do single leg calf-raises - 10 per day on each leg.
These all work pretty well for me and are easy to do anywhere while still being quite challenging.

See Ya,

Phil.


I tried doing hindu squats for a week but the pain was horrible, i wonder how can you do single leg squats Shocked


Last edited by Awesomus_Maximus on Wed Jul 12, 2017 7:48 am; edited 1 time in total
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Arydigital



Joined: 24 Aug 2017
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Thu Aug 24, 2017 9:35 am    Post subject: hey Reply with quote

As far as efficiency, I would say, after having done both the Outside workout for some time (over a year, in all) and the SG for just two weeks, that SG is just as efficient, if not moreso. It recruits a wide range of muscles throughout the body, http://www.arydigital.tv/ary-digital-old-dramas/ and makes them work together. Much more holistic. I was only bringing in the other because I think that some of the quotes from the so-called experts may be useful in supporting the way of the glove.

Good point about the psychological benefits of useful movements, too.
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