Snacking addiction

No Snacks, no sweets, no seconds. Except on Days that start with S. Too simple for you? Simple is why it works. Look here for questions, introductions, support, success stories.

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TingTing
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Snacking addiction

Post by TingTing » Tue Jun 09, 2009 10:35 pm

I've been reading this board for awhile now and I am impressed by how everyone is coping....or not coping.

I really don't know if this is the right topic to put in here. But anyway......

I use to think I was addicted to sweets. Now I realize that what I'm really addicted to are potato chips. With sweets, I just eat a little bit and I'm okay. I rarely binge on chocolates or cookies or cakes or candies, but unfortunately I can really binge on potato chips. I've had a thing for potato chips since I was a kid and that craving has never left me. I am struggling with the not snacking thing on this diet and I have never been successful, not once, about not snacking.

My question is, how do you control or get rid of an addiction for potato chips or anything salty or greasy? I really need help here and I don't know who to speak to about this.

Unless I can conquer my addiction, I'll never be able to do the No S diet.

Thanking everyone in advance for the suggestions. :)

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bluebunny27
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Post by bluebunny27 » Tue Jun 09, 2009 11:06 pm

I have problems with the word 'Addiction' there. Chips don't have a substance that make them addictive. You can't get addicted to anything, you just like 'em, that's all, it's not like heroin or ...

Take coffee for example, ok, there's caffeine in there, you might be really annoyed if you can't have coffee for an entire day, but you wouldn't pull your hair out and throw up either if you don't have one. You could go on and on and on without any problems at all, you'd just get used not to have coffee.

I'd say the best method is to go cold turkey, that's what I would do. If that sounds too harsh, then just have a very tiny portion of chips once in a while, 2-3 chips, not half the bag, takes will power to stop, sure. That won't hurt you too much and you'll still get to taste the precious chips.

Chips aren't really "Food" anyway, hardly any
nutrients, nothing that is good for you in there.
It shouldn't even be called 'Food', ;-)

If you are not ready to quit eating bad food like that, it seems like you are bound to have a very tough time, if you're really sincere about losing weight than it shouldn't be a problem to start eating good food, not things like chips that have so much calories, fat, sodium and don't give you much energy either.

When I see CHIPS at the grocery store I am not even tempted to grab a bag because I know they aren't good for me, I haven't had a chip in months, I'd rather eat good healthy food now.

Cheers !

Marc ;-)

Disclaimer : I am following a more extreme version of the 'No-S' diet.
I made my own personal modifications to the original plan (Diet & Exercise)
What I am doing should not be misinterpreted as being a typical 'No-S' diet experience.
11/01/2008 : 280.0 pounds - - - 06/05/2009 : 214.0 pounds
7 months 5 days / 66.0 pounds

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la_loser
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good news!

Post by la_loser » Tue Jun 09, 2009 11:18 pm

With No S you really can still have those things. . . You just eat them as a part of your one plate at a meal. No S defines a snack as anything eaten BETWEEN meals. It's when not what you eat. And how much you eat of it-your plateful. Certainly it might not be as healthy to have chips with every meal but as you wean youself off between meal snacks at some point you will begin to fill your plate with better choices. I could eat cheetos all day long but now I have them only as a part (now only occasionally!) instead of scarfing down a big ole bag by myself. The main No S page addresses this specifically as does the book. You CAN do this. I'm amazed with my progress with no snacks.

I see Marc has offerred his ideas since I have been writing this. Please remember that No S there are NO good or bad foods. That's the beauty of No S. His view and diet philosophy are way more restrictive than what the vast majority of us are all about.

Welcome to the boards and don't be a stranger!
LA Loser. . . well on my way to becoming an LA Winner. :lol:

wosnes
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Post by wosnes » Tue Jun 09, 2009 11:25 pm

Okay, since No-S is more about habits than about the food you eat, you can incorporate chips into your meals. Have them at lunch. Have them at dinner if you must. But none between meals.

Is that the healthiest choice? No, but if it enables you to stick to the plan, so be it.

There are those who claim that you can be addicted to salt; I'm not at all sure about that.

The other option is to give up potato chips cold turkey.
"That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do. Not that the nature of the thing itself has changed but our power to do it is increased." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

"You are what you eat -- so don't be Fast, Easy, Cheap or Fake."

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bluebunny27
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Post by bluebunny27 » Tue Jun 09, 2009 11:56 pm

Wow, L.A. Loser, you put a 'Disclaimer' on top of the 'Disclaimer' I already have at the end of all my messages now ... That's like 'Disclaimer' squared ! Awesome ! ;-)

Anyway, it's all good if people want to have potato chips on their plate and still use the word 'Diet' to describe what they are doing ... whatever floats people's boats is fine with me.

'Disclaimer' below. :-)

Cheers !

Marc ;-)

Disclaimer : I am following a more extreme version of the 'No-S' diet.
I made my own personal modifications to the original plan (Diet & Exercise)
What I am doing should not be misinterpreted as being a typical 'No-S' diet experience.
11/01/2008 : 280.0 pounds - - - 06/05/2009 : 214.0 pounds
7 months 5 days / 66.0 pounds

wosnes
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Post by wosnes » Wed Jun 10, 2009 12:21 am

marcdesbiens wrote: Anyway, it's all good if people want to have potato chips on their plate and still use the word 'Diet' to describe what they are doing ... whatever floats people's boats is fine with me.
The first two definitions of "diet": 1 a: food and drink regularly provided or consumed b: habitual nourishment.

Diet doesn't automatically mean deprivation or elimination of foods you enjoy -- even to lose weight.
"That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do. Not that the nature of the thing itself has changed but our power to do it is increased." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

"You are what you eat -- so don't be Fast, Easy, Cheap or Fake."

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~reneew
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Post by ~reneew » Wed Jun 10, 2009 1:31 am

I totally relate to you Ting! I have no sweet tooth, but I do enjoy sweets. Salty crunchy things however is a huge deal!!! I agree that it is an addiction. A very strong adiction. And I won't go into detail because my kids are aware of my no S identity and are too curious, but I have had true addictions in my life. This snack stuff is no less in my opinion. The "pull" is sometimes unstopable. It can rule you.

I am finding success with no S because I can still have it! You just have to wait until the next meal. Set it firmly in your head that you need to wait for the next meal. I have chips with many meals, but far less than even a couple of months ago. Sometimes I plan to have chips with the next meal and actually forget about it when the time comes. Back in October when I lost the "first 20" (gained again when I quit and am now loosing again) I had chips for most lunches at least. I now plan popcorn every weekend and when I don't have it, I miss it all week. My advice is to start a habitcal and go 1 day at a time. And you can vent to me anytime... I relate! We're all in this together!
I guess this doesn't work unless you actually do it.
Please pray for me

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Kodama
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Post by Kodama » Wed Jun 10, 2009 2:00 am

I'm kinda with marc on this one.

Potato chips are not food. I classify them as another type of S that Reinhard didn't mention: starts with S, has four letters, rhymes with "fit", and I don't want any of THAT on my plate! :shock:

If I really want some, it can wait till an S-day. Even then, I'll never gorge on it. Just a taste.

I mean, technically, I suppose you could put it on a meal plate during the week and that'd be within the rules. But personally, I've had enough of being heavy, so that's not a compromise I'm willing to make. Perhaps when I'm at a healthier weight, I might feel less stringent.

Sorry that I can't think of anything more productive on how to handle a chip addiction. All I can think of is willpower, and thinking of chips as that 4th S.
--- Stephen ---
My No S Diet Progress
"Two hands working can do more than a thousand clasped in prayer."

kccc
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Post by kccc » Wed Jun 10, 2009 2:13 am

This is going to sound contradictory, but...

1) I do believe that there is an addictive quality to junk food. I have felt the need to go on "sugar fasts" in the past to break the cycle.

2) However, I think using the term "addiction" is not helpful. It is a term that gives up control and conscious choice. I would avoid it simply to reclaim the element of choice. Say that you really like chips, that you find them hard to resist, that they're a big problem for you... all of that is fine. But avoid saying "you're addicted."

In terms of breaking the cycle, there are two main routes. One is cold turkey, as several have suggested. When I was doing "sugar fasts," it usually took me about three days to feel that the effects had left my system. So, you might try that, and just tough it out for a few days.

The second path is "weaning" - gradual cutting down until the snack (or snack food) is eliminated. In terms of No-S, that would mean limiting the trigger foods to mealtimes only during N-days.

Which will work best for you depends on your own nature. Some people do better with an "all or nothing" approach, others feel totally deprived that way, and need to have "little bites" of what they like.

In either case, you CAN do this. Set mini-goals, and gradually raise the bar until you reach your goal. Come here for support and we'll cheer you on. :)

(PS - As far as chips not being a good choice... don't worry about that yet. If you're limiting them to meals, you're probably cutting them drastically to begin. As time goes on, your meal choices will probably become more healthy - incrementally, and gently - but there's no need to push too hard on that at the beginning. The first goal is to build habit.)
Last edited by kccc on Wed Jun 10, 2009 2:16 am, edited 1 time in total.

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bluebunny27
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Post by bluebunny27 » Wed Jun 10, 2009 2:13 am

Awesome, look at all those comments !! ;-)

I was talking about someone deciding to have chips every day, several times a day even ... and sayin' it was a bad idea. That's just *MY* own personal opinion, anyone who wants to do this and thinks it's fine, go right ahead but you might have problems losing weight because you are sabotaging your own efforts by doing that. Get ready to work out *A LOT* if your plan is to eat chips all the time and still lose weight. (and the chips won't give you the energy to do it so it's a 'double-whammy', you need good food to work out like CRAZY, remember ?? Also to avoid feeling hungry 30 minutes after you've finished eating, most important !) ;-)

I'm not talking about an occasional 2-3 potato chips every other day if you can't live without 'em, that's fine ... but not at every meal, that would be excessive.

It's the same with everything, you can micro bite all the time on various things you crave and it won't matter too much in the long run, the problem is if you have too much of anything for long periods of time, especially bad things of course, I mean it won't be a big problem if you decide to eat plain raw carrots 2-3 times a day, that's all I'm sayin' ... ;-)

Cheers !

Marc ;-)

Disclaimer : I am following a more extreme version of the 'No-S' diet.
I made my own personal modifications to the original plan (Diet & Exercise)
What I am doing should not be misinterpreted as being a typical 'No-S' diet experience.
11/01/2008 : 280.0 pounds - - - 06/05/2009 : 214.0 pounds
7 months 5 days / 66.0 pounds

Betty
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Post by Betty » Wed Jun 10, 2009 8:53 am

Make Salty Snacks an S. Eat chips only on S days, sometimes. You've got the structure to beat this right in front of you. Nothing wrong in adding another "S" as needed :wink:

Best of luck,

Betty
Be your own best friend and advocate. Be gentle and kind to yourself. Your weight is not the problem.

Before: 140
During: 140 (again!)

ThomsonsPier
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Post by ThomsonsPier » Wed Jun 10, 2009 9:13 am

I have similar preferences; I get around the salt and fat cravings by restricting myself to no more than one serving of crisps per day if it will fit on the plate and seems sensible as part of the meal (I'll have crisps with a sandwich or chilli, but not with, say, sausage, mash and gravy). I end up having about two portions per week, if that. The other safeguard is my girlfriend, who generally eats all of the crisps before I get near them.

Neither salt nor fat are chemically addictive. As with anything else your body is used to, however, it will take a short time to adapt to a new balance when you stop. The cravings will depart after a couple of weeks as your electrolyte level returns to normal (sodium and potassium levels are interconnected; when they balance again, you'll feel a lot better). Now I only eat such foods rarely, I find that a craving for them tends to be a genuine call from the body for salt or fat.

If you still can't stop and have identified salty snacks as a problem, try drinking a large glass of water with your crisps. You'll feel very full very quickly. Failing that, prioritise the habit; let some other stuff slide if you have to, but stop eating crisps at all costs. After a couple of weeks, pay attention to your other eating habits again. You could also try only allowing yourself crisps if you make them yourself; they taste good but they're a pain to cook and you'll smell of oil all the time. If that doesn't put you off, little will.

To those who view crisps is such a dim light, I'd point out that I've treated them as any other food made of potatoes, vegetable oil and salt for several years and I had no trouble cutting down from borderline overweight to perfectly healthy. I've also successfully used crisps as a short-term energy source for intensive exercise, so your mileage may vary.
ThomsonsPier

It's a trick. Get an axe.

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Kodama
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Post by Kodama » Wed Jun 10, 2009 11:26 am

ThomsonsPier wrote: To those who view crisps is such a dim light,
That'd be me... But I just want to clear up that I'm a big believer in individuals. As similar as we can be, we can also be VASTLY different, both in how our body works, and our minds (psychology) too.

When I give 'advice', it's from MY perspective, what seems to work for me. In the end, isn't that all any of us CAN do?

A guiding principle that I've had comes from a book called "In Defense of Food". It goes like this: "Eat FOOD, not too MUCH, mostly PLANTS". And by food, he means basically more natural, less processed foods. A twinkie in a plastic wrapper hardly qualifies as FOOD. Using this guideline, when I come across a food I rarely eat, I stop and think: "Is this FOOD? or is it (as the author put it) merely an edible food-like substance? Do I REALLY want to ingest this edible food-like substance?" Rarely, the answer is yes, usually not. For me this helps.

I've wandered off-topic I'm afraid. Sorry. Just one last comment. I also find it neat that the 'Not too MUCH' portion of the books guideline phrase fits in real well with the No-S diet... :)
--- Stephen ---
My No S Diet Progress
"Two hands working can do more than a thousand clasped in prayer."

vmelo
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Post by vmelo » Wed Jun 10, 2009 12:36 pm

I would highly recommend the book The End of Overeating, written by the former head of the FDA. In it, he discusses several scientific studies that were done that show that food affects the same part of our brain as is affected by drugs like heroin. I can't explain all the details of the studies because it would take too long, and I'm terrible at remembering scientific terms, but the upshot of it is that we can indeed become addicted to the feelings that come from eating food that we love. This is especially true today because foods are created and marketed in such a way that the sugar-fat combination is emphasized.

I don't know which is better: to try to control the habit (as some here have suggested) by eating a couple of servings a week or just to go cold turkey. I LOVE sweets, and I've tried both of the aforementioned strategies and failed at both, so I don't have an answer for you, but I wish you luck with it.

Ms
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Potato chips ARE addictive!!!

Post by Ms » Wed Jun 10, 2009 12:47 pm

Potato chips ARE addictive. I don't have the all the facts, etc. in front of me right now, but I've read that fast foods, chips, and many typical snack foods have stuff added to them that make them addictive, like drugs, heroin, caffeine, etc. The only difference is that it takes longer for a person to get addicted to these low-nutrient foods than it does for one to get addicted to drugs. A book that explains this very well and concisely for the layperson is "Eat To Live" by Dr. Joel Fuhrman. There are other articles & books, etc. I've read on this, (including my mother's nutrition books for her nursing program from the '80's) but that book is pretty current, is what comes to mind right now and it's available in most bookstores.

But really, no one needs a book to say that junk food is addictive. Just watch a person try to quit eating some junk food they've eaten almost every day and grown to love cold turkey. If they've become addicted to it, you'll see them experience the some of the same withdrawal symptoms and exhibit the same behavioral patterns as any addict would.

In any event, Reinhard doesn't ban chips. (That would go against his rallying cry for moderation, not deprivation). He said that it's your choice to make them a part of your meal, and don't eat any more. Or, you can save them until S-days and enjoy them in the quantity you want. But after 5 days straight of not having any, you may not even want them.

Also, my friend's experience may be of some help or encouragement. My friend has been very heavy for most of her life. After several years of yo-yo Weight Watchers and various other diet programs, she finally started to lose weight this year. She told me that when she added more fruits and vegetables to her diet and began walking on a daily basis, her cravings and desires for pastries and other junk food continually decreased until she no longer wanted them. And she didn't try to ban them from her diet; her body just doesn't want them anymore. And, she's not on any silly diet program.

Okay, sorry for the thesis. Have a nice day and good luck!

ThomsonsPier
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Re: Potato chips ARE addictive!!!

Post by ThomsonsPier » Wed Jun 10, 2009 1:14 pm

Ms wrote:grown to love cold turkey
But what do you do if you're addicted to cold turkey?
ThomsonsPier

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guadopt1997
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Post by guadopt1997 » Wed Jun 10, 2009 1:14 pm

KCCC wrote:I do believe that there is an addictive quality to junk food.
I agree. I think the premise of the new book "The end of overeating" is that the combination of salt, fat, and sugar definitely make you want to eat more.

From Publishers Weekly
Conditioned hypereating is a biological challenge, not a character flaw, says Kessler, former FDA commissioner under presidents Bush and Clinton). Here Kessler (A Question of Intent) describes how, since the 1980s, the food industry, in collusion with the advertising industry, and lifestyle changes have short-circuited the body's self-regulating mechanisms, leaving many at the mercy of reward-driven eating. Through the evidence of research, personal stories (including candid accounts of his own struggles) and examinations of specific foods produced by giant food corporations and restaurant chains, Kessler explains how the desire to eat—as distinct from eating itself—is stimulated in the brain by an almost infinite variety of diabolical combinations of salt, fat and sugar. Although not everyone succumbs, more people of all ages are being set up for a lifetime of food obsession due to the ever-present availability of foods laden with salt, fat and sugar.

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Kodama
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Post by Kodama » Wed Jun 10, 2009 1:30 pm

Ok, if evidence is mounting that junk foods can be addictive, then isn't the usual prescribed solution to go cold turkey? An alcoholic can't taper down, he must cease! How to go about that is the tricky part, eh? It's only if one is NOT addicted to alcohol that one may enjoy it, in moderation.

(Although I'm not convinced that actual addiction occurs, I'm willing to admit I could be mistaken, and entertain the notion.)
--- Stephen ---
My No S Diet Progress
"Two hands working can do more than a thousand clasped in prayer."

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Post by mimi » Wed Jun 10, 2009 1:37 pm

I'll tend to agree with KCCC's post. This could be further evidenced by the peaceful feelings that accompany N days with junk food all but eliminated.

One more reason to limit Esses on weekends and special days too, huh?

Mimi :D
Discovered NoS: April 16, 2007
Restarted once again: July 14, 2011
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Post by winnie96 » Wed Jun 10, 2009 2:07 pm

Amen, big time, to those recommending "The End of Overeating"!

Don't just focus on how "bad" the food industry is for manipulating the sugar/fat/salt content of processed foods, however. Pay careful attention to the "Conditioned Hypereating Emerges" chapters (which gave me a whole new take on how the physiology of our stimulus/rewards system works vis-a-vis food), and the "Food Rehab" chapters (which urge us to "replace chaos with structure" and sound, to me, like they could have been written by Reinhard).

When I'm in hyper-eating overdrive, I often describe myself as being taken over by aliens. Whether aliens or addiction come to mind in describing overeating, I think the research presented in this book is very helpful in replacing the "force beyond my control" notion with a better understanding of how our bodies operate. For me, being armed with this kind of information puts choosing my strategies for dealing with food on a more rational plane. Get thee away, aliens !!!

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Post by BrightAngel » Wed Jun 10, 2009 2:19 pm

by guadopt1997
re book.. "The end of overeating"
...premise is that the combination of salt, fat, and sugar definitely make you want to eat more.

Kessler ...describes how, since the 1980s,
the food industry, in collusion with the advertising industry, and lifestyle changes
have short-circuited the body's self-regulating mechanisms,
leaving many at the mercy of reward-driven eating.
I purchased and read this book, and enjoyed it a great deal.

However, For me, it wasn't because of the food-industry, advertising,
or food availability since the 1980s.
I personally have been "at the mercy"
of reward-driven eating since my birth in the 1940s.

My family liberally indulged in frequent snacking on sweets & salty carbs.
We didn't always have chips, but we always had crackers,
and a variety of homemade sweets like candy, cookies and cake available to us.
One childhood favorite was a sleeve of saltines with a glass of whole milk.
Neither my parents nor my brother was ever overweight.
that happened only to me after purberty, and to my sister later in life.

My eating has always been "reward-driven",
In fact my point of view has always been that people who think food is merely fuel
are abnormal to the point of insanity.
:oops:
BrightAngel - (Dr. Collins)
See: DietHobby. com

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~reneew
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Post by ~reneew » Wed Jun 10, 2009 3:07 pm

I have noticed that the longer I'm doing no S, the less junk I'm eating. I started out thinking that I can eat some junk on my plate at meal time, say a side of chips and stay in control of it. That's what got me going in the first place... the promise of having it later, just waiting. I still "plan" to have it when I really crave it, but when the meal comes, I usually don't want it now. I'm rarely eating ANY junk food now, at least on N days. I do need to make better choices sometimes, but if I had to eat tons of raw veggies and fruit all day and never have some fun food, I wouldn't be here. I'll stick to Reinhard's plan...
I guess this doesn't work unless you actually do it.
Please pray for me

Too solid flesh
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Snacking addiction

Post by Too solid flesh » Wed Jun 10, 2009 7:05 pm

Initially having crisps or tortilla chips as part of a meal worked for me. Over time I have come to want other foods more, so the crisps just gradually got displaced by more satisfying food.

Buying small, individual serving packs of crisps, rather than the large bags, may help as well.

Good luck with this.

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Re: Potato chips ARE addictive!!!

Post by Ms » Wed Jun 10, 2009 8:08 pm

ThomsonsPier wrote:
Ms wrote:grown to love cold turkey
But what do you do if you're addicted to cold turkey?
I don't know why you'd ask this, considering that the part you quoted said nothing about being addicted to cold turkey. You can love eating a food and not be addicted to it, you know.

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Post by reinhard » Wed Jun 10, 2009 11:14 pm

KCCC wrote:
2) However, I think using the term "addiction" is not helpful. It is a term that gives up control and conscious choice. I would avoid it simply to reclaim the element of choice. Say that you really like chips, that you find them hard to resist, that they're a big problem for you... all of that is fine. But avoid saying "you're addicted."
I don't know what kind of biochemistry goes on when you develop bad habits, presumably something, even short of heroine, etc. And I have no idea where potato chips fall on the spectrum. But I think, as KCCC says, that the term "addiction" (and similarly ubiquitous diety terms like "cravings") are not helpful for most people in most cases -- it suggests that this is something totally beyond your control.

Habit is a much better concept, I think, it's both more accurate and more useful. It acknowledges that there is an irrational pressure being exerted on you, that your choices aren't totally free, but unlike "addiction" which is always bad and always more or less irresistible, "habit" has direction -- it can be good or bad --, and degree -- habits can be strong or weak.

So the power that's working against you now is not just resistible, it can be conscripted to work for you. I'm convinced it's true -- I've experienced it. And I find it hugely motivating. This seemingly little detail of phrasing ("addiction" vs "habit") can make an enormous difference.

ThomsonsPier wrote:
But what do you do if you're addicted to cold turkey?
Whatever you do, do not quit cold turkey on cold turkey. That would upset some deep cosmic balance. :-)

marcdesbiens wrote:
Wow, L.A. Loser, you put a 'Disclaimer' on top of the 'Disclaimer' I already have at the end of all my messages now ... That's like 'Disclaimer' squared ! Awesome !
If anyone needs a disclaimer here it's me. Sheesh, what would my lawyer say if he knew I've been posting here disclaimerless all this time :-)

Stay tuned..

Reinhard

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Post by vmelo » Thu Jun 11, 2009 12:40 am

BrightAngel wrote:. . .For me, it wasn't because of the food-industry, advertising, or food availability since the 1980s.
I personally have been "at the mercy"
of reward-driven eating since my birth in the 1940s.
One of my friends recommended the Kessler book, and my reservation before reading it was that it was going to be another of those "poor-me-I'm-a-victim-of-[insert anything here]." While Kessler does point out the culpability of the food industry, he doesn't seem to feed into the victim mentality, and that's why I think I enjoyed the book. So, that's my long-winded way of saying that I, like you, put the blame for my eating squarely on my shoulders (or my stomach, butt, etc.--take your pick).
BrightAngel wrote:In fact my point of view has always been that people who think food is merely fuel are abnormal to the point of insanity.[/color] :oops:
I must agree with this.

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Post by TingTing » Thu Jun 11, 2009 1:06 am

To divert for a moment:
Take coffee for example, ok, there's caffeine in there, you might be really annoyed if you can't have coffee for an entire day, but you wouldn't pull your hair out and throw up either if you don't have one. You could go on and on and on without any problems at all, you'd just get used not to have coffee.
I believe coffee is very addictive. I knew this woman who accidentally drank decaf coffee one morning and spent the rest of the day white-faced, sick, nauseus and yeah, she puked....alot! In her case, her coffee is a hardcore addiction.

Thanks, ThomsonsPier and Ms. for making me laugh! Go Cold Turkey! That's funny......! Except now I'm craving a turkey sandwich. :lol:

Thank you all for all the suggestions. What boils down to is this: either I give up the chips during "No S days" or incorporate them into my meals or have them only on "S days". I know that potato chips are unhealthy and I shouldn't be eating it.

I made an attempt to not eat the chips today by substituting something a little healthier. I bought soy chips today and had them with my sandwich. Then I remembered the small bag of free potato chips that came with my sandwich and I had to have it! To my credit, I only ate a small handful and threw the rest away. I hope there will soon come a time that I won't need potato chips anymore. I'm going to pray......alot. :(

I'm going to find a way to work this out. And yes, I'll just call it a "craving" rather than an "addiction" in order to give it less power over me.

Thanks again! :D

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FarmerHal
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Post by FarmerHal » Thu Jun 11, 2009 1:19 am

My totally willpowerless snack is CRACKERS. I especially love the wheatbles ones or the all bran crackers. Ritz, club, you name it, wheat thins YUM. I do not keep them there because I know (and have) I will break down and eat the whole box.


Although, from time to time, I might have some on my lunch plate with a sandwich and a fruit or veggie of some kind.

So with the chips, I would have them with lunch perhaps and not worry too much as long as it's one handful on the plate and not the whole bag, or second handful...
{FarmerHal} ...previously Shamrockmommy...
Vanilla NoS... Making good habits.
Restart 12/2015, size 22
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wosnes
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Post by wosnes » Thu Jun 11, 2009 12:48 pm

marcdesbiens wrote:Chips aren't really "Food" anyway, hardly any
nutrients, nothing that is good for you in there.
If we're just talking potato chips, they're really not too bad, at least as compared to other chips and junk food. Potatoes, fat and salt.
~reneew wrote:I have noticed that the longer I'm doing no S, the less junk I'm eating.
In general, I've noticed the same thing. One of the strange things I've noticed as what I eat has improved (more whole food, less junk) the move I crave sweets. "Good" sweets, but sweets nonetheless. The first time I noticed this was when I was following Fuhrman's "Eat to Live" program. I would have done just about anything for cookies. Increasing fruit consumption didn't help at all -- it made it worse.
"That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do. Not that the nature of the thing itself has changed but our power to do it is increased." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

"You are what you eat -- so don't be Fast, Easy, Cheap or Fake."

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midtownfg
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Post by midtownfg » Thu Jun 11, 2009 6:37 pm

I think I have purchased more potato chips since I started No S in March than I bought in the entire previous year. Being able to put a small amount on my plate with a healthy sandwich is so much more satisfying and structured than my previous chip gorge-fests that would end with an empty bag and my hands covered in grease and salt.

vmsurbat
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Post by vmsurbat » Fri Jun 12, 2009 1:52 pm

midtownfg wrote:I think I have purchased more potato chips since I started No S in March than I bought in the entire previous year. Being able to put a small amount on my plate with a healthy sandwich is so much more satisfying and structured than my previous chip gorge-fests that would end with an empty bag and my hands covered in grease and salt.
I agree! I can't say I have *more* than pre-NoS, but the times I do have chips (on the plate, part of the meal, not too often) are extremely satisfying. No "I gotta just cram it all in before the guilt gets too much" pressure. Just a nice handful to add a bit of satisfying crunch to an enjoyable lunch.
Vicki in MNE
7! Yrs. with Vanilla NoS, down 55+lb, happily maintaining and still loving it!

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harpista
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Post by harpista » Mon Jun 15, 2009 3:43 am

BrightAngel wrote: My eating has always been "reward-driven",
In fact my point of view has always been that people who think food is merely fuel
are abnormal to the point of insanity. :oops:
Oh thank you God. I thought I was the only one with this opinion and have carefully hid my feelings on the subject for years!!! :lol:
Nulla palma sine pulvere.
'No garland of victory without first the dust of the arena.'

Sometimesians, unite!

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mimi
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Post by mimi » Mon Jun 15, 2009 11:21 am

Isn't that something that there are so many of us who have the same feelings - and yet think we are all alone in feeling them...ironic...once folks begin airing how they feel, we see how NOT alone we really are...that's why these boards are so helpful, right? I gain SO much from listening to others.

Mimi :D
Discovered NoS: April 16, 2007
Restarted once again: July 14, 2011
Quitting is not an option...
If you start to slip, tie a knot and hang on!
Remember that good enough is... good enough.
Strive for progress, not perfection!

Betty
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Post by Betty » Mon Jun 15, 2009 11:40 am

We don't eat much junk in our house, at least not of the processed kind :roll:

But because we don't eat processed foods like chips very often, I can really see what they do to my kids. My oldest son is very thin. He just doesn't like to eat very much and will not eat a mouthful after he's full. BUT give him something with msg in it, and he will eat and eat. It's amazing. My mother served him rice a roni once and he ate the whole box.

I have no idea if msg is addictive, but it can't be good for anyone who is watching his or her weight. Maybe you could check the packaging of your chips and make sure they're the potato, salt, oil kind. They might be less "addictive"?

Betty
Be your own best friend and advocate. Be gentle and kind to yourself. Your weight is not the problem.

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wosnes
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Post by wosnes » Mon Jun 15, 2009 12:00 pm

Betty wrote:We don't eat much junk in our house, at least not of the processed kind :roll:

But because we don't eat processed foods like chips very often, I can really see what they do to my kids. My oldest son is very thin. He just doesn't like to eat very much and will not eat a mouthful after he's full. BUT give him something with msg in it, and he will eat and eat. It's amazing. My mother served him rice a roni once and he ate the whole box.

I have no idea if msg is addictive, but it can't be good for anyone who is watching his or her weight. Maybe you could check the packaging of your chips and make sure they're the potato, salt, oil kind. They might be less "addictive"?
It might not be MSG -- that might be a coincidence. Things like Rice-
A-Roni are so highly processed that they're not satisfying. You eat more to get satisfied.
harpista wrote:BrightAngel wrote:

My eating has always been "reward-driven",
In fact my point of view has always been that people who think food is merely fuel
are abnormal to the point of insanity.


Oh thank you God. I thought I was the only one with this opinion and have carefully hid my feelings on the subject for years!!!
I came across this "food is only fuel" idea in something else I was reading the other day. Here's my thought: If food is "only" for nourishment/fuel, then sex is "only" for procreation! :oops:
"That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do. Not that the nature of the thing itself has changed but our power to do it is increased." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

"You are what you eat -- so don't be Fast, Easy, Cheap or Fake."

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