Food Pushers

No Snacks, no sweets, no seconds. Except on Days that start with S. Too simple for you? Simple is why it works. Look here for questions, introductions, support, success stories.

Moderators: Soprano, automatedeating

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Lizzy6
Posts: 47
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2016 8:22 pm

Food Pushers

Post by Lizzy6 » Sat Nov 16, 2019 1:00 am

Oh boy! I had a terrible time with them today. We had a breakfast at work today. I had already eaten, so I didn't even want to go in the room. I had so many people nagging me. I said "No thank you" as nicely as I could, but they wouldn't stop. Someone finally threatened to not leave until I went to get something. I got some food and threw it away later. I know they meant well, but it was so annoying.

How do you handle food pushers?

automatedeating
Posts: 4008
Joined: Sat Aug 31, 2013 2:16 pm

Re: Food Pushers

Post by automatedeating » Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:51 am

I'm firm, polite, and change the subject. I do not need to eat their food to take care of their emotional needs. Once I realized that, it got easy. Sometimes I say I'm really just not hungry for it; I tell them it looks great and I bet they love baking and I'm sure everyone will enjoy it. How can they force me to eat when I say no thanks?

If someone is particularly annoying, I tell them the food they are proffering spikes my blood sugar (which is true, but I avoid using this line unless someone is overly aggressive).

In summary, they never win on this anymore.

I just reread what you wrote and that person that said they wouldn't leave - oh, my - that would have brought out my biggest smile. "Oh really? You can just sit your ass in here all day then - at least you'll have plenty of food to keep you company. I, on the other hand, will feel light as a feather and have zero regrets that I passed up this sugar-fest." I seriously would have said something in that vein. I also might use a self-deprecating approach - this has NEVER failed. "You are so lucky you can eat that and feel good! If I eat that I always regret it and I feel sluggish later and if I check my blood sugar it's gone up to 160." That works 100% of the time.
Month/Year-BMI
8/13-26.3; 8/14-24.5; 5/15-26.2; 1/16-26.9; 9/16-25.6; 8/17-25.8; 11/17-26.9; 3/18-25.6; 8/18-24.5; 10/18-23.8; 1/19-23.4; 2/19-22.7; 3/19-22.1; 10/19-21.8

Soprano
Posts: 676
Joined: Thu Mar 08, 2018 8:56 pm
Location: UK

Re: Food Pushers

Post by Soprano » Sun Nov 17, 2019 8:44 am

I definitely wouldn't eat in that situation. No one has the right to control what an adult puts in their body.

Love autos response.

Jx
Never give up on a dream just because of the time it will take to accomplish it. The time will pass anyway.

sharon227
Posts: 291
Joined: Fri May 18, 2018 12:13 pm

Re: Food Pushers

Post by sharon227 » Mon Nov 18, 2019 12:16 pm

Wow that's obnoxious. Sorry you had to deal with that. I'd be very tempted to say “I’m really curious why it's so important to you that I eat something now”, possibly adding “ when I just said I didn’t want to”, but of course that all depends on your work culture and power balance between you and Food Pusher. I do think it's possible to get away with the first part if said in a friendly inquisitive tone and with a smile in some work situations but not others.

cb3g
Posts: 15
Joined: Tue Oct 22, 2019 11:43 pm

Re: Food Pushers

Post by cb3g » Thu Nov 21, 2019 11:44 pm

For me, the best way to deal with it is to just honestly say, "I already ate breakfast and I'm trying not to eat between meals. But thanks!"

I don't like talking about any sort of "diet" with people - I think it's sort of gauche to bring it up - but honestly I feel like it's the most effective thing. In my experience they are then all of a sudden supportive and not offended that you aren't partaking. I did this at a friend's house when she wanted me to have some of the cake she'd made (which I also really wanted but it was still Friday). She totally understood and even offered to pack up a piece for me to have on Saturday, which I gratefully agreed to.

Lizzy6
Posts: 47
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2016 8:22 pm

Re: Food Pushers

Post by Lizzy6 » Sat Nov 23, 2019 8:52 pm

It was very frustrating. The next time, I will stand my ground. If I have to use my serious face I will. I think that this might be part of learning new eating habits. Saying no will be a must in a food-abundant society.

sharon227
Posts: 291
Joined: Fri May 18, 2018 12:13 pm

Re: Food Pushers

Post by sharon227 » Tue Nov 26, 2019 3:49 am

Learning how to say no is definitely an important skill in modern society if you want to lead a healthy lifestyle!

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DaveMc
Posts: 387
Joined: Tue Jul 28, 2009 12:28 pm

Re: Food Pushers

Post by DaveMc » Fri Nov 29, 2019 12:17 pm

That's incredibly annoying, sorry to hear that it happened to you!

Under normal circumstances, I've usually found that people aren't actually paying that much attention to what other people do or don't eat, so the most I've ever had to do is a quick "I'm trying not to eat between meals" to duck out of that sort of thing.

I would never actually do this, but your story would make me want to turn to the person and say, "All right, please stand by, because I'm going to hurt you now."

oolala53
Posts: 9653
Joined: Mon Oct 06, 2008 1:46 am
Location: San Diego, CA USA

Re: Food Pushers

Post by oolala53 » Sat Nov 30, 2019 11:02 pm

Learning to deal with all kinds of environmental pressures is definitely part of the skill set needed. I have said before that often get inspiration from thinking about my naturally slim nephew-in-law, who rarely gets influenced to eat even one more bite than he wants on his own. I've also seen him leave many a small plate with most of the food he took still on it. Sometimes he will set it aside and claim he will eat it later. I'm not sure there is any data on whether or not he does!
Count plates, not calories. Three a day. 9 years & counting
Age 65
SBMI Jan/10-30.8
Jan/12-26.8
Mar/13-24.9 Stayed at +/- 8-lb. for three years Sept/17 22.8 (but more fluctuation)
Mar/18 22.2

There is no S better than Vanilla No S.

Whosonfirst
Posts: 470
Joined: Thu Nov 16, 2006 12:32 pm
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Re: Food Pushers

Post by Whosonfirst » Mon Dec 02, 2019 1:02 am

Lizzy6 wrote:
Sat Nov 16, 2019 1:00 am
Oh boy! I had a terrible time with them today. We had a breakfast at work today. I had already eaten, so I didn't even want to go in the room. I had so many people nagging me. I said "No thank you" as nicely as I could, but they wouldn't stop. Someone finally threatened to not leave until I went to get something. I got some food and threw it away later. I know they meant well, but it was so annoying.

How do you handle food pushers?
How is that even possible? If you really can't handle this situation, lying is always good way. Tell the person "threatening" you that you're nauseous, or that you just vomited in the bathroom. Or just enjoy the misery of the person threatening you that really wants you to eat so they won't feel guilty about the amount they're planning on eating, and sit at your desk or work area and pleasantly go about getting work started while they suffer.

Lizzy6
Posts: 47
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2016 8:22 pm

Re: Food Pushers

Post by Lizzy6 » Mon Dec 02, 2019 1:12 am

oolala
My husband is naturally slim. He does not overeat. He eats all things, but I have never seen him binge. He can even eat a few chips and stop. I just think we either have a body that has balanced hormones or we don't. I don't have balanced hormones. I don't want to have to explain to people why I don't want to taste a little bit of the wonderful dessert they made. I would have to say "No thank you. If I eat that spoonful of your fabulous cake, I will want to keep eating sweets for at least a couple of hours." That is the trap. When your body is out of balance, a little bit turns into a lot very quickly.

Whosonfirst
Yes, the person did. He sat right at my desk until I went to the room where the food was being served. It was extremely frustrating!

Whosonfirst
Posts: 470
Joined: Thu Nov 16, 2006 12:32 pm
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Re: Food Pushers

Post by Whosonfirst » Mon Dec 02, 2019 1:26 pm

Lizzy6 wrote:
Mon Dec 02, 2019 1:12 am
oolala
My husband is naturally slim. He does not overeat. He eats all things, but I have never seen him binge. He can even eat a few chips and stop. I just think we either have a body that has balanced hormones or we don't. I don't have balanced hormones. I don't want to have to explain to people why I don't want to taste a little bit of the wonderful dessert they made. I would have to say "No thank you. If I eat that spoonful of your fabulous cake, I will want to keep eating sweets for at least a couple of hours." That is the trap. When your body is out of balance, a little bit turns into a lot very quickly.

Whosonfirst
Yes, the person did. He sat right at my desk until I went to the room where the food was being served. It was extremely frustrating!
Sounds like harassment to me. Sometimes you just have be a little rude, or maybe steel your resolve and tell them firmly to bug off. If he's still there, pick up the phone and dial your HR dept.

ladybird30
Posts: 549
Joined: Sun May 07, 2017 10:41 pm

Re: Food Pushers

Post by ladybird30 » Tue Dec 03, 2019 10:30 pm

Hi Lizzy,
now that I know that the man concerned was actually sitting next to your desk while trying to get you to eat, I can understand why you went and collected food which you didn't want. But as far as I am concerned, his behaviour was out of line.
Three meals a day - not too little not too much, but just right

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