Absolute newbie with questions...

Here you'll find a discussion thread for each of the canonical and major non-canonical shovelglove moves. If you have questions or comments about any of these moves, just update the existing discussion for it. If you have a new move, add a new discussion (preferably with the name of your new move in the title). Ideally there will be just one discussion thread per move that everyone adds to, but it's no tragedy if a little bit of redundancy creeps in.
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OrganicGal
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Absolute newbie with questions...

Post by OrganicGal » Wed Apr 16, 2008 7:06 pm

I've just started No S-ing and am quite used to walking as my main form of cardio, but would like to do shovelglove for strength training. My question is...what size 'shovel' should I buy to start? They're not cheap so I don't want to buy one too light or too heavy. Also is there a certain length in the handle to be concerned with when buying one?

I am a very strong woman, according to my boyfriend and he is very strong! I have a lot of strength in my back and legs...which is good when it comes to proper lifting techniques.

Any suggestions gratefully received. :)
Creating and sustaining the No S habits are the only thing that will take me in the direction I want to go!

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david
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Post by david » Wed Apr 16, 2008 8:09 pm

If you are relatively strong I think a ten pound hammer will work for you without having to upgrade any time soon. You can go to the hardware store and get the feel of one to make sure.

If you start shovelgloving be sure to take it easy for the first few weeks!

--david

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OrganicGal
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Post by OrganicGal » Wed Apr 16, 2008 9:04 pm

Thanks for the tip David...I appreciate it. I shall go to my local Home Depot and hoist a few this weekend if I can't get there sooner. :)
Creating and sustaining the No S habits are the only thing that will take me in the direction I want to go!

jules
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Post by jules » Thu Apr 17, 2008 8:03 am

I use an 8 lb. hammer. When I first started shugging, I'd been lifting weights for a while. Not wussy "girly" things either. I'd definitely try both 8 and 10 lb. The weight at the end of a stick feels a lot heavier than an equivalent on a dumbbell that's for sure.

jules

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OrganicGal
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Post by OrganicGal » Thu Apr 17, 2008 3:09 pm

Thanks Jules! I'll bare that in mind when I go looking at them this weekend. :)
Creating and sustaining the No S habits are the only thing that will take me in the direction I want to go!

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reinhard
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Post by reinhard » Thu Apr 17, 2008 6:29 pm

It's a tough call... My gut feeling is play it safe and go with 8, but if you go slow and keep your hands high on the shaft towards the hammer head I guess you will get more mileage out of the 10 without it being unduly brutal up front.

But avoiding injury and not having your workout be so hard that it isn't fun are very important things. If not spending an extra $25 in a few months to upgrade is your chief reason for going with the heavier hammer, you might want weight the pros and cons a bit more carefully...

Best of luck, whatever you decide!

Reinhard

sgtrock
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Post by sgtrock » Thu Apr 17, 2008 7:30 pm

Plus you can always slap cheap ankle weights onto it to "upgrade" more gradually. They come in all different sizes; we found a pair of small neoprene circular 1-pound weights that fit the handle perfectly. Just be sure to wrap them inside the sweater/cover and you're good to go.

Adding that 2 pounds or so to the end of the stick is a sneakily dramatic difference.
"It does not matter how slowly you go so long as you do not stop." -- Confucius, an early Everyday Systems pioneer

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