Soup season!!!

No Snacks, no sweets, no seconds. Except on Days that start with S. Too simple for you? Simple is why it works. Look here for questions, introductions, support, success stories.

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~reneew
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Soup season!!!

Post by ~reneew » Mon Sep 20, 2010 7:34 pm

We're entering soup season! Soup is lower in calories and fills you up faster... plus gives you more fluids.

What's your favorite?

Anyone want to share benefits of soup?

Recipes?
I guess this doesn't work unless you actually do it.
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Nicest of the Damned
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Post by Nicest of the Damned » Mon Sep 20, 2010 7:53 pm

I'm interested in how soup works with the rules of No-S. Do you put the bowl on your plate, and put other stuff around it? I know some people eat salad in a separate bowl, but I could see where that might be a problem with some soups. Is it OK to eat certain kinds of soups in a separate bowl?

I know there are no official answers to these questions. I'm just wondering how other people have worked soup into their No-S diets.

wosnes
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Post by wosnes » Mon Sep 20, 2010 8:57 pm

Soup season is year 'round as far as I'm concerned. I eat soup nearly every day for lunch. I put the soup in a bowl, set the bowl on a plate and fill the rest of the plate with bread, raw vegetables or a small salad and some fruit. To be perfectly honest, the fruit usually doesn't fit on the plate. I could eliminate the bread, but it makes a huge contribution to how satisfied I am by the meal.
"That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do. Not that the nature of the thing itself has changed but our power to do it is increased." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

"You are what you eat -- so don't be Fast, Easy, Cheap or Fake."

clarinetgal
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Post by clarinetgal » Tue Sep 21, 2010 5:39 am

I made homemade soup for the first time, and it was SO good! I put a bowl of my soup onto a plate, and I filled the rest of my plate with a piece of bread with butter and a small salad. It was such a good meal!

ThomsonsPier
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Post by ThomsonsPier » Tue Sep 21, 2010 8:42 am

I tend to use a bowl and a small side plate with a roll on it and think of the soup as a sandwich filling. I also tend to get bored of soup about halfway down the bowl, so overeating is never a problem.
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Post by wosnes » Tue Sep 21, 2010 12:53 pm

clarinetgal wrote:I made homemade soup for the first time, and it was SO good! I put a bowl of my soup onto a plate, and I filled the rest of my plate with a piece of bread with butter and a small salad. It was such a good meal!
Here's (scroll down) a link to the basic soup recipe I use. This used to be at usaweekend.com with a lot of variations. However, they updated their site and it's gone. The recipe and other variations are also in Pam Anderson's book How to Cook Without a Book.

If you scroll down here, you'll find my basic formula for bean soups (from dried beans).
"That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do. Not that the nature of the thing itself has changed but our power to do it is increased." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

"You are what you eat -- so don't be Fast, Easy, Cheap or Fake."

clarinetgal
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Post by clarinetgal » Wed Sep 22, 2010 5:30 am

I found it! Thanks, Wosnes!

marygrace
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Post by marygrace » Wed Sep 22, 2010 12:21 pm

Anyone a fan of split pea soup? My grandmother used to make it for me all the time, but I don't see her very often anymore since I moved to Texas. I've tried making it myself, but it's just not the same.

Aside from that, I WISH it was soup weather here. The temps are still in the low 90s and I even though I'd love to eat a cozy bowl of soup, it's just too hot.

Urban Ranger
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Post by Urban Ranger » Wed Sep 22, 2010 12:22 pm

I made hm tomato soup last night. And for those who ask, I put it in a bowl and then on a plate. The plate is a regular size plate and the bowl holds a litttle over a cup. I also put on the plate a remekind of hm onion and yogurt dip, crackers, those gorgeous bright green olives from WF, a wedge of campo. Also, b/c I couldn't really think of anything I wanted for a protein, I just had a veg hamburger patty and crumbled it into my soup.

I love soup.

I like lentil soup, potato soup, tomato soup. All kinds really.
Potato soup is soooo easy!

Into pot put a med to large onion per person and one for the pot (I put extra so we can have left-overs).

Cover with water till about half done.

Add an onion (or two depending on size of family/number of potatoes inthe pot) and a bag of broccoli. Simmer till everything is done.

Drain. Return to pot and add enough milk to just cover. Bring to a gentle simmer till it's hot through. S/p to taste.

We've discovered that we like it in chunks but I used to use the hand blender to make it smoothe.

On the counter or at the table arrange bowls of butter, shredded cheese, bacon sprinkles, chives/green onion, gk yogurt or sour cream, diced tomatoes. Top as desired.

Again, I put it in bowl and the bowl on the plate. I also have crackers and a fruit or something.

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Post by Urban Ranger » Wed Sep 22, 2010 12:23 pm

wosnes wrote:Soup season is year 'round as far as I'm concerned.
Yep, what she said!

wosnes
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Post by wosnes » Wed Sep 22, 2010 1:09 pm

Urban Ranger wrote:
wosnes wrote:Soup season is year 'round as far as I'm concerned.
Yep, what she said!
Yea, and we've had a record number of 90 degree+ days here in Indiana this year. In fact, we just a a new high record for September 20th (or maybe it was yesterday). Supposed to get in the 90s today, too. I just realized that I didn't make any cold soups this summer, and I have a few good recipes -- plus I usually buy some borscht!

marygrace -- I like split pea soup. I think that the simpler you keep it, the better it is. Here's the recipe I use -- I cut it from a newspaper years ago:

Split Pea Soup

2 cups dried split peas (about a 1 pound bag)
1 medium onion, finely chopped
1 carrot, finely chopped
1 stalk celery, sliced thin
1/2 pound ham, cut in cubes (can be omitted for vegetarian version)
1 bay leaf
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground pepper

Combine all ingredients in slow cooker. Add enough water to cover (about 4 cups). Cook on low 6 to 8 hours or on high 3 to 4 hours. Hot milk can be used to thin soup if necessary before serving. Remove bay leaf before serving. Yields 6 servings.

To cook on the stovetop, combine all ingredients in a 4 quart pan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for about 1½ hours. You may need to use more liquid.

You can top the soup with croutons, parsley or chives, a spoon of sour cream or a splash of sherry -- or nothing!

Enjoy!
"That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do. Not that the nature of the thing itself has changed but our power to do it is increased." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

"You are what you eat -- so don't be Fast, Easy, Cheap or Fake."

wosnes
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Post by wosnes » Wed Sep 22, 2010 1:10 pm

Urban Ranger wrote:
wosnes wrote:Soup season is year 'round as far as I'm concerned.
Yep, what she said!
Yea, and we've had a record number of 90 degree+ days here in Indiana this year. In fact, we just a a new high record for September 20th (or maybe it was yesterday). Supposed to get in the 90s today, too. I just realized that I didn't make any cold soups this summer, and I have a few good recipes -- plus I usually buy some borscht!

marygrace -- I like split pea soup. I think that the simpler you keep it, the better it is. Here's the recipe I use -- I cut it from a newspaper years ago:

Split Pea Soup

2 cups dried split peas (about a 1 pound bag)
1 medium onion, finely chopped
1 carrot, finely chopped
1 stalk celery, sliced thin
1/2 pound ham, cut in cubes (can be omitted for vegetarian version)
1 bay leaf
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground pepper

Combine all ingredients in slow cooker. Add enough water to cover (about 4 cups). Cook on low 6 to 8 hours or on high 3 to 4 hours. Hot milk can be used to thin soup if necessary before serving. Remove bay leaf before serving. Yields 6 servings.

To cook on the stovetop, combine all ingredients in a 4 quart pan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for about 1½ hours. You may need to use more liquid.

You can top the soup with croutons, parsley or chives, a spoon of sour cream or a splash of sherry -- or nothing!

Enjoy!
"That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do. Not that the nature of the thing itself has changed but our power to do it is increased." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

"You are what you eat -- so don't be Fast, Easy, Cheap or Fake."

scgal
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Post by scgal » Wed Sep 22, 2010 2:36 pm

Lazy woman's homemade chicken soup for the crockpot.

In the morning pour 1 big can (49 oz) (or 4 small, 14 oz) of chicken stock into a crockpot set on low.

I use thawed/slightly thawed cut up chicken tender pieces, unbreaded, about 5-6. You could cut up 2 breast pieces, also. Probably 1 lb of chicken.

Add pepper, onion flakes, and seasonings to taste.

Cook on low all day. About 15 minutes before serving, add a small bag of wide egg noodles (1/2 of a large bag) to the soup and stir. Ready when noodles are cooked (about 15 minutes).

You can add vegetables to taste, but my picky eaters like it without. Serve with bread, crackers, etc. Guaranteed to cure what ails you!

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Post by wosnes » Wed Sep 22, 2010 3:40 pm

Sorry for the double post -- have no idea how that happened.

Urban Ranger -- I love potato soup, too. I make it the way my mom made it -- with butter dumplings. After I cook the potatoes and other vegetables, I add the dumplings and cook for 10 minutes, until they're done. Then I add the milk (or, if I'm being really decadent, cream) until it's heated through.

Oh, and back to Mark Bittman, I like his recipe for corn chowder. I've always omitted the tomato and I like the variation with bacon. Yum!

http://dinersjournal.blogs.nytimes.com/ ... der&st=cse
"That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do. Not that the nature of the thing itself has changed but our power to do it is increased." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

"You are what you eat -- so don't be Fast, Easy, Cheap or Fake."

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~reneew
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Post by ~reneew » Wed Sep 22, 2010 5:27 pm

I can never get myself to eat soup when it's hot out.
I try to have at least one soup night a week.
I either have a seperate small salad size plate along with the bowl, or put the bowl on my plate.

One time I read about how people used to use up leftovers by putting any leftovers (that would be good in a soup) into a med. size container in the freezer. I also kept some of the water that the veggies were cooked in. When it gets full, add bouillon or stewed tomatos (pureed or not). Cook and serve. At first, I thought "yuck" but a friend told me that she always does this and it's absolutely great, so I tried it. I have to say that it was definitely one of the best soups that I have ever made and I usually make homeade soup at least once a week. Honest... it was great!!! I don't know if it was the many flavors or what. I plan on trying it again soon.

I've also heard that you can add the tomato or bouillon to most hotdishes and it makes great soup. One day when I had leftovers from my favorite chicken hotdish recipe, I cut it all up and added some bouillon and milk. It became an awesome soup!

This is my favorite soup recipe ~ also the fav. of my 4 kids:

Deb's Clam Chowder

3-4 (6 oz.) cans of chopped clams
6 potatoes, peeled and diced
6 carrots, diced
1/2 C. chopped onion
1/2. C. butter (1 stick)
2 cans cr. of mushroom soup
2 cans (12oz.) evaporated milk
1 tsp. salt
1/2 tsp. pepper
1 tsp. parsely for a touch of color (opt.)
1 1/2 C. water

Drain clam juice into large kettle. Add veggies, butter and water. Cook over med. heat until tender. Stir in the rest. You can add corn starch mixed with the water if you want it thick. I usually double it for my family of 6 because we fight over the leftovers. :roll:
I guess this doesn't work unless you actually do it.
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Urban Ranger
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Post by Urban Ranger » Wed Sep 22, 2010 5:33 pm

Ha! I had to google butter dumplings. I make those but not for potato soup. I just didnt' know they were called butter dumplings.

We are veggies around here and so, as you might guess, don't eat chicken. We do occasionally greatly desire a pot of chicken and dumplings, however. I put on a pot of Not Chicken Broth by Better than Bouillon and add the butter dumplings. Cook till done, serve. BtB isnt' what you might call health food (Vegetable (Carrot, Celery, Onion), Salt, Hydrolyzed Soy Protein, Maltodextrin, Cane Sugar, Canola Oil, Natural Flavors, Autolyzed Yeast Extract, Corn Syrup Solids, Turmeric. -- pasted from their site) but it's better than a lot of that kind of thing and quite delicious. We don't bother with the fake chicken b/c really, for chicken and dumplings, it's really all about broth and dumplings anyway.

And while I'm certain this would make a nice N Day meal, I would probably save it for an S Day b/c I want another bowl!

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Post by wosnes » Wed Sep 22, 2010 6:50 pm

Urban Ranger wrote:Ha! I had to google butter dumplings. I make those but not for potato soup. I just didnt' know they were called butter dumplings.

We are veggies around here and so, as you might guess, don't eat chicken. We do occasionally greatly desire a pot of chicken and dumplings, however. I put on a pot of Not Chicken Broth by Better than Bouillon and add the butter dumplings. Cook till done, serve. BtB isnt' what you might call health food (Vegetable (Carrot, Celery, Onion), Salt, Hydrolyzed Soy Protein, Maltodextrin, Cane Sugar, Canola Oil, Natural Flavors, Autolyzed Yeast Extract, Corn Syrup Solids, Turmeric. -- pasted from their site) but it's better than a lot of that kind of thing and quite delicious. We don't bother with the fake chicken b/c really, for chicken and dumplings, it's really all about broth and dumplings anyway.

And while I'm certain this would make a nice N Day meal, I would probably save it for an S Day b/c I want another bowl!
I make a dumpling with baking powder for chicken and dumplings. In The New Laurel's Kitchen there's a recipe for Golden Broth that is to be used whenever you might want chicken stock. I've only made it once, and it was tasty. I think you could add celery and carrot to the Golden Broth, too.

1 onion, diced
1 clove garlic
1/2 cup yellow split peas
2 tablespoons oil
1/2 teaspoon turmeric
2 quarts hot water

Saute onion, garlic and split peas in oil until delicately brown. Stir in turmeric and add water. Simmer for at least half an hour. Strain for a thin broth, puree for a thick one.

VARIATION: Green broth. Substitute split peas for yellow. Add a bay leaf and omit the turmeric. For a very full-flavored broth, add a carrot and potato, cut up. Celery leaves are good, too.
"That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do. Not that the nature of the thing itself has changed but our power to do it is increased." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

"You are what you eat -- so don't be Fast, Easy, Cheap or Fake."

marygrace
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Post by marygrace » Wed Sep 22, 2010 11:27 pm

wosnes wrote:
Urban Ranger wrote:
wosnes wrote:Soup season is year 'round as far as I'm concerned.
Yep, what she said!
Yea, and we've had a record number of 90 degree+ days here in Indiana this year. In fact, we just a a new high record for September 20th (or maybe it was yesterday). Supposed to get in the 90s today, too. I just realized that I didn't make any cold soups this summer, and I have a few good recipes -- plus I usually buy some borscht!

marygrace -- I like split pea soup. I think that the simpler you keep it, the better it is. Here's the recipe I use -- I cut it from a newspaper years ago:

Split Pea Soup

2 cups dried split peas (about a 1 pound bag)
1 medium onion, finely chopped
1 carrot, finely chopped
1 stalk celery, sliced thin
1/2 pound ham, cut in cubes (can be omitted for vegetarian version)
1 bay leaf
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon ground pepper

Combine all ingredients in slow cooker. Add enough water to cover (about 4 cups). Cook on low 6 to 8 hours or on high 3 to 4 hours. Hot milk can be used to thin soup if necessary before serving. Remove bay leaf before serving. Yields 6 servings.

To cook on the stovetop, combine all ingredients in a 4 quart pan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer for about 1½ hours. You may need to use more liquid.

You can top the soup with croutons, parsley or chives, a spoon of sour cream or a splash of sherry -- or nothing!

Enjoy!
My grandmother makes hers really simple, too. I have a feeling she probably puts at least a little bit of oil in it, but has never made it with the ham. Thanks for sharing this--I'll try it when the weather cools off!

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~reneew
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Post by ~reneew » Wed Sep 29, 2010 7:05 pm

Does anyone have a great recipe for veggie beef soup?
I guess this doesn't work unless you actually do it.
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wosnes
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Post by wosnes » Wed Sep 29, 2010 9:24 pm

~reneew wrote:Does anyone have a great recipe for veggie beef soup?
Why, it just so happens I do!

Crock Pot Beef Soup

1 pound hamburger or stew meat
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 medium onion, chopped fine
1 15-ounce can diced tomatoes
1½ cups water
1 10½-ounce can beef consomme
1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
1 cup salsa (or marinara sauce)
2-3 carrots, sliced
2-3 stalks celery, sliced
1 bay leaf
½ teaspoon each: basil, oregano, thyme, rosemary and ground black pepper
Grated Parmesan Cheese (for serving), optional

Brown meat, garlic and onion in skillet (may need to add 1-2 tablespoons oil if using stew meat). Drain. Add to crock pot along with other ingredients. Cook on low for 6 hours or high for 3 hours. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

If cooking on top of the stove, brown meat in Dutch oven or soup pot. Drain. Add remaining ingredients and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer, cover and cook until meat and vegetables are tender, about 2 hours.

I often add a potato or two and 1/2-1 cup of peas and/or green beans to this. If I add the peas, I do it in the last few minutes of cooking.
"That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do. Not that the nature of the thing itself has changed but our power to do it is increased." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

"You are what you eat -- so don't be Fast, Easy, Cheap or Fake."

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Post by Nicest of the Damned » Wed Sep 29, 2010 10:43 pm

We had vichyssoise last night. We served it hot instead of chilled- we usually do that, since I'm not a big fan of cold soups.

3 smallish or 2 big leeks, white and light green parts only, sliced in food processor

Around 1 pound potatoes. Yukon Golds are good. I used fingerlings this time, because we had some to use up. You can peel them entirely, or not. I didn't last night (you can't really, with fingerlings), and the soup was good. The potatoes should be sliced in the food processor, but not mixed in with the leeks yet.

About 3 tablespoons unsalted butter

6 cups chicken stock or veggie chicken stock (we use veggie stock, because we keep kosher)

1/2 cup milk. You can use cream or half-and-half if you want to be more traditional

Fresh chives, snipped into little pieces

Salt and fresh ground pepper to taste

Lightly saute the leeks in the butter, in a large soup pot. I recommend nonstick for easy clean-up. When the leeks are soft and translucent, stir in the potatoes. Season the mixture with the salt and pepper. Add the stock and simmer until you are ready to eat (the longer it simmers, the better it will be). Puree the soup with an immersion blender until all the chunks are gone (hopefully you don't always miss one, the way I do). Stir in the milk and chives, and serve.

wosnes
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Post by wosnes » Thu Sep 30, 2010 2:41 am

The vichyssoise sounds good!
"That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do. Not that the nature of the thing itself has changed but our power to do it is increased." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

"You are what you eat -- so don't be Fast, Easy, Cheap or Fake."

noSer
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Post by noSer » Thu Sep 30, 2010 3:50 am

Love soup. Here's one I serve for company that always gets requests for the recipe. Not exactly low cal, but I think it would be good before adding the sour cream and cream.

Creamy White Chili

7 servings

1 lb. boneless, skinless chicken breast, cubed ½â€
(or a rotisserie chicken from the grocery store)
1 med. Onion, chopped
1 ½ tsp garlic powder
1 Tbsp vegetable oil
2 cans (15 ½ oz) great northern beans, rinsed and drained
1 can (14 ½ oz) chicken broth
2 cans (4 oz) chopped green chilies
1 tsp salt
1 tsp ground cumin
1 tsp dried oregano
½ tsp pepper
¼ tsp cayenne pepper
1 cup sour cream
½ cup whipping cream

In large saucepan, sauté chicken, onion and garlic power in oil until chicken is no longer pink. Add beans, broth, chiles and seasonings. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer uncovered for 30 minutes. Remove from the heat; stir in sour cream and cream. Serve immediately.

Recipe from Taste of Home Feb/Mar 99


My variations:

I always double this recipe. Their 7 servings must be pretty small, or a side dish. It is maybe 7 servings doubled.

I always use rotisserie chicken for this recipe. It just tastes better One small or half a large. Just traditional recipe, nothing fancy.

I use 2-4 cans of beans for the double recipe.

I use 2 small cans of or 1 lg can green chilies for the double recipe.

I have used milk or nothing in place of the whipping cream.

I have sauted the onion, garlic and chicken, and then put all the ingredients except milk and sour cream into the crock pot. Heat on low 4-5 hours, add sour cream and milk before serving. Warm the milk and sour cream in microwave if desired.
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bluebunny27
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Post by bluebunny27 » Thu Sep 30, 2010 6:56 am

Wow, good coincidence, because I had soup for dinner earlier today ! ;-) I mostly have soup during the colder months : Sept. to april ...

I made it myself, nothing too complicated.

I chopped all sorts of veggies and put those in a big *POT*

- carrots
- turnips
- potatoes
- bell peppers
- onions
- celery

I added : Lentils and barley, not sure how much I put in there, a cup of each ? I don't usually measure too precisely ... ;-)

I added a big can of whole tomatoes (w. tomato juice)
I added more tomato juice and also some water and let all this simmer for a few hours. Adding various spices at random. ;-)

It was a big *POT* of soup though so there is enough left for another time, maybe 2 times ...

Cheers !

Marc ;-)

38 Years Old, 5'10" Tall
Nov. 1st. 2008 : 280 Pounds
Nov. 1st. 2009 : 190 Pounds
(1 Year : - 90 Pounds)

Current Weight : 191 Pounds

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Post by wosnes » Thu Sep 30, 2010 9:30 am

noSer wrote:Not exactly low cal, but I think it would be good before adding the sour cream and cream.
We need to stop thinking that low-cal and low-or no-fat are the best examples of healthy eating. Fat is not unhealthy -- and it's pretty tasty, too!
"That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do. Not that the nature of the thing itself has changed but our power to do it is increased." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

"You are what you eat -- so don't be Fast, Easy, Cheap or Fake."

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bluebunny27
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Post by bluebunny27 » Thu Sep 30, 2010 2:16 pm

Yes, you need good fats too.

I always put 1 tbsp. of olive oil on my salads. Helps me to absorb the nutrients and vitamins from the veggies.

Using oil is a good idea. I try to avoid margarine and butter, using oil as often as I can instead (In moderation, because it contains a lot of calories even if it's good for you !)

Here's a good article : Good fats vs bad fats

http://bit.ly/cYFitU

Cheers !

Marc ;-)

38 Years Old, 5'10" Tall
Nov. 1st. 2008 : 280 Pounds
Nov. 1st. 2009 : 190 Pounds
(1 Year : - 90 Pounds)

Current Weight : 192 Pounds

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Post by Nicest of the Damned » Thu Sep 30, 2010 3:02 pm

Maryland Flag Chili (Can be vegetarian or vegan)

1 largish onion, chopped in the food processor

Salt and fresh ground black pepper

Olive oil for sauteeing onion

1 can white beans (or navy or Great Northern), with liquid from can drained.

1 can black beans, with liquid from can drained.

1 can light red kidney beans, with liquid from can drained.

1 can dark red kidney beans, with liquid from can drained.

1 can corn, or equivalent amount of frozen corn, with liquid from can drained if using canned corn.

1 28-oz can (or 2 smaller cans) diced tomatoes

Beef or vegetarian stock (we use vegetarian beef-flavored stock), amount varies by how "soupy" you like your chili

A splash of tequila (optional)

Chili powder and cumin to taste. You can put some cayenne in, too, if you like it spicy.

This recipe can be made entirely from things that keep for a long time (no trip to the grocery store required), requires no precision measuring or difficult cooking techniques, and only dirties one pot and the food processor. I recommend a big nonstick soup pot for easy clean-up.

It was inspired by Chili Con Corny from the UC Santa Cruz cafe. The name comes from the fact that it contains the colors of the Maryland state flag. I'm originally from Maryland, and went to grad school at UC Santa Cruz.

Saute the onion with the salt, pepper, and stock in a big soup pot, until the onion is translucent and soft.

Add the beans, corn, tomatoes, stock, chili powder, and cumin and stir to mix well. Bring to a boil. If you're using it, add the tequila. Taste and adjust seasonings.

Cook until you're ready to eat. It will be better the longer it cooks.

Serve with crumbled tortilla chips on top. If you're not making vegan chili, you could also top it with some shredded Cheddar cheese or sour cream.

Makes enough for dinner for 4.

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Post by wosnes » Thu Sep 30, 2010 3:24 pm

Nicest of the Damned wrote:Maryland Flag Chili (Can be vegetarian or vegan)

1 largish onion, chopped in the food processor

Salt and fresh ground black pepper

Olive oil for sauteeing onion

1 can white beans (or navy or Great Northern), with liquid from can drained.

1 can black beans, with liquid from can drained.

1 can light red kidney beans, with liquid from can drained.

1 can dark red kidney beans, with liquid from can drained.

1 can corn, or equivalent amount of frozen corn, with liquid from can drained if using canned corn.

1 28-oz can (or 2 smaller cans) diced tomatoes

Beef or vegetarian stock (we use vegetarian beef-flavored stock), amount varies by how "soupy" you like your chili

A splash of tequila (optional)

Chili powder and cumin to taste. You can put some cayenne in, too, if you like it spicy.

This recipe can be made entirely from things that keep for a long time (no trip to the grocery store required), requires no precision measuring or difficult cooking techniques, and only dirties one pot and the food processor. I recommend a big nonstick soup pot for easy clean-up.

It was inspired by Chili Con Corny from the UC Santa Cruz cafe. The name comes from the fact that it contains the colors of the Maryland state flag. I'm originally from Maryland, and went to grad school at UC Santa Cruz.

Saute the onion with the salt, pepper, and stock in a big soup pot, until the onion is translucent and soft.

Add the beans, corn, tomatoes, stock, chili powder, and cumin and stir to mix well. Bring to a boil. If you're using it, add the tequila. Taste and adjust seasonings.

Cook until you're ready to eat. It will be better the longer it cooks.

Serve with crumbled tortilla chips on top. If you're not making vegan chili, you could also top it with some shredded Cheddar cheese or sour cream.

Makes enough for dinner for 4.
I've made something similar to this for years (minus the tequila --which sounds like a good addition to me!) The recipe I have calls for a packet of ranch dressing mix and one of taco seasoning mix. I think it also calls for a can of pinto beans. And I've also seen it with a pound of ground beef, browned. With or without meat, it's good stuff!

If you have leftovers, put them in a casserole dish, top with hash brown potatoes and shredded cheddar cheese. Bake at 425 degrees for 30 minutes. Nice hearty meal for a chilly (or downright COLD) night.
"That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do. Not that the nature of the thing itself has changed but our power to do it is increased." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

"You are what you eat -- so don't be Fast, Easy, Cheap or Fake."

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Post by Nicest of the Damned » Thu Sep 30, 2010 3:37 pm

All-Nighter French Onion Soup

(Don't worry, the soup pulls the all-nighter, not you)

Several large onions, at least 1-2 per person, sliced in the food processor.

Olive oil for sauteeing onions

Beef or vegetarian beef-flavored stock, at least 2 cups per person

2 cups chicken or vegetarian chicken-flavored stock

Thyme, preferably fresh (we grow it in our herb garden), though dried will work, too

Pepper (preferably freshly ground) and salt to taste

A splash of Scotch, red wine, or water

Croutons or toasted artisan bread (optional)

Grated cheese. Smoked Gouda, the kind you get from Trader Joe's, is really good. A good Cheddar will work, too. I recommend against the bagged pre-shredded Cheddar or the overly processed type of Cheddar here.

Get out the same big nonstick soup pot you used for the chili and the vichyssoise. Put the oil, onions, thyme, salt, and pepper in the pot and stir until mixed. Cook the onions over medium to medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until they have cooked down a lot and turned dark brown. This will probably take 30-45 minutes.

Pour the Scotch, red wine, or water into the pot. Bring it to a boil and stir it around. Be sure it picks up any little brown bits on the bottom of the pot.

Transfer the onions and Scotch to a crockpot. Add the beef and chicken stock. Put the lid on the crockpot. Put the crockpot on Autoshift or High, and leave overnight.

Serve with the toasted bread or croutons and grated cheese.

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Post by Nicest of the Damned » Thu Sep 30, 2010 3:38 pm

wosnes wrote:If you have leftovers, put them in a casserole dish, top with hash brown potatoes and shredded cheddar cheese. Bake at 425 degrees for 30 minutes. Nice hearty meal for a chilly (or downright COLD) night.
My husband likes to drain the solids from the leftover chili and wrap them in flour tortillas to make a burrito.

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Post by wosnes » Thu Sep 30, 2010 4:05 pm

Nicest of the Damned wrote:All-Nighter French Onion Soup

(Don't worry, the soup pulls the all-nighter, not you)

Several large onions, at least 1-2 per person, sliced in the food processor.

Olive oil for sauteeing onions

Beef or vegetarian beef-flavored stock, at least 2 cups per person

2 cups chicken or vegetarian chicken-flavored stock

Thyme, preferably fresh (we grow it in our herb garden), though dried will work, too

Pepper (preferably freshly ground) and salt to taste

A splash of Scotch, red wine, or water

Croutons or toasted artisan bread (optional)

Grated cheese. Smoked Gouda, the kind you get from Trader Joe's, is really good. A good Cheddar will work, too. I recommend against the bagged pre-shredded Cheddar or the overly processed type of Cheddar here.

Get out the same big nonstick soup pot you used for the chili and the vichyssoise. Put the oil, onions, thyme, salt, and pepper in the pot and stir until mixed. Cook the onions over medium to medium-high heat, stirring occasionally, until they have cooked down a lot and turned dark brown. This will probably take 30-45 minutes.

Pour the Scotch, red wine, or water into the pot. Bring it to a boil and stir it around. Be sure it picks up any little brown bits on the bottom of the pot.

Transfer the onions and Scotch to a crockpot. Add the beef and chicken stock. Put the lid on the crockpot. Put the crockpot on Autoshift or High, and leave overnight.

Serve with the toasted bread or croutons and grated cheese.
Sounds good. I like white wine in onion soup and a splash of brandy.

Last year I made a mushroom and barley soup which I thought was okay (remembering that I'm not fond of grains). I kept reducing the barley until I had none and ended up with a very tasty mushroom and onion soup. I wish I could remember what I did, because it was very good! I served it with the croutons and cheese. Guess I need to play around and figure out what I did.
"That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do. Not that the nature of the thing itself has changed but our power to do it is increased." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

"You are what you eat -- so don't be Fast, Easy, Cheap or Fake."

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Post by ~reneew » Thu Sep 30, 2010 6:14 pm

Yum!

I started out reading all of these recipes for ideas and ended up printing off all of them because they sound so good. I love any recipe that says "crockpot" or "wine"... but tequilla, scotch, brandy ~ yum! I need to try these! Thanks guys! I'll be sure to add your "name" to the recipe if it makes it in my special recipe book :wink: oh and, I've always wanted a white chili recipe. I tried one once and it was aweful. I can't wait to try this one!
I guess this doesn't work unless you actually do it.
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Post by Nicest of the Damned » Thu Sep 30, 2010 6:49 pm

I should note that some people think you have to run French onion soup under the broiler to melt and brown the cheese. I disagree. I think it is better to have less of a good-quality cheese. This smaller quantity of grated cheese melts into the soup, no broiler or special bowl necessary. It's also better for you, of course.

A cheese that you grate yourself makes a difference here. The grated bits will be softer and will melt more easily than pre-grated cheese, and it doesn't have whatever that powdery stuff is that they put on pre-grated cheese to stop it from sticking together. I have almost zero arm strength or stamina, and I manage to do it with a rotary cheese grater (I always end up skinning my fingers on box graters). Some food processors have grating disks, if you really can't use a rotary grater.

Pre-grated cheese has its place (on top of Maryland Flag Chili is one of them), and I won't disdain anybody for using it. But I advise against using it in my French onion soup recipe.

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Post by Sienna » Fri Oct 01, 2010 1:40 am

I have a quick and easy cajun chicken soup I like to make.

I start with a can of plain cream of chicken soup (usually the Campell's brand Heart Healthy kind). While it's heating, I chop some chicken, coat it in cajun seasoning and cook it the skillet with some chopped onions and sometimes peppers (to be honest I usually use whatever I have left over in the fridge - if I don't have any fresh peppers and onions sometimes I use onion flakes or dried pepper). Then I add the chicken to the soup and simmer for a few minutes. It takes about 15 minutes or so to make and it re-heats really well.

If you want something more substantial, you can add less water to the condensed soup, simmer a little longer and serve it over pasta.
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Post by harpista » Wed Oct 13, 2010 5:39 am

My favourite soup, which I just made/served at our (Canadian) family Thanksgiving:

Apple-Butternut Squash Soup

Serves 6, says the recipe: more like 10-12 appetizer portions in our house, or 8 main dishes. Stores in fridge: up to about 3 days. Stores in freezer: up to a month (and I personally couldn't tell: YES!). The hardest part of the recipe is prepping the squash, but, I love it.

1 tbsp unsalted butter
1 medium onion, diced
1 butternut squash (about 2 lb.), peeled, seeded, and chopped
4 red or golden apples, peeled, cored and chopped
2 tsp. coarse salt
1 1/2 tsp ground cumin
1/2 tsp coriander
1/2 tsp ground ginger
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper
1/4 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 cups stock (I use chicken but veggie would also work, I don't think meat stock or fish stock would be good though)
2 1/2 cups water or more if required

Garnish options in the recipe:
1 apple, finely diced and tossed in lemon juice (optional)
1 jalapeno, thinly sliced, for garnish (optional)
Sour cream

Here's what I use to garnish:
Sour cream
Green onions
Parsley sprigs

1. Melt butter in a large saucepan over medium heat. Cook the onion in the butter until softened, stirring occasionally (about 4 minutes). Add squash, cook until softened, stirring occasionally (about 10 minutes).

2. Add apples, salt, cumin, coriander, ginger, cayenne, black pepper, stock, and water (until it covers the contents). Bring to a boil. Reduce to simmer and cook until fruit and veg is very soft, about 30 minutes.

3. Puree in batches in food processor or blender until smooth, return to saucepan. Heat over low; thin with water if desired or necessary. Garnish before serving.

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Post by wosnes » Thu Nov 04, 2010 4:08 pm

I just made Minestra di Riso e Patate (Rice and Potato Soup) from Lidia Bastianich. It's very simple and very good. The soup reminds me of the Great Depression recipes from Clara Cannucciari. I cut the recipe in half, added half an onion and used Parmesan instead of Romano (I had it on hand).
"That which we persist in doing becomes easier for us to do. Not that the nature of the thing itself has changed but our power to do it is increased." -- Ralph Waldo Emerson

"You are what you eat -- so don't be Fast, Easy, Cheap or Fake."

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Post by Too solid flesh » Fri Nov 05, 2010 8:14 am

harpista wrote:My favourite soup, which I just made/served at our (Canadian) family Thanksgiving:

Apple-Butternut Squash Soup
I used your recipe a couple of weeks ago, and it was delicious. Thank you, harpista.
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Post by Nicest of the Damned » Fri Nov 05, 2010 8:43 pm

I'm simmering our turkey bones from our Rosh Hashanah turkey (they were in the freezer) to make turkey stock. We'll be having turkey and stars soup tonight.

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Post by ~reneew » Tue Nov 09, 2010 2:53 pm

I've had the split pea, beef and chili ~ all really great and yummy. I'm tempted to add some sort of alcohol to all soups now. I don't know why, I don't drink much, it just gives a richer flavor. i don't really like squash but my hubby loves it ~ just can't get myself to make that yet. I have been freezing the leftovers in small containers, so now I'm pretty much taken care of for leftover soup for a while. :wink:
I guess this doesn't work unless you actually do it.
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